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6 Leadership Styles And When You Should Use Them

Daniel Goleman’s leadership styles

  1. Pacesetting leader - “Do as I do, now”: expects and models excellence and self-direction. 
  2. Authoritative leader - “Come with me”: mobilizes the team toward a common vision.
  3. Affiliative leader - “People come first”:  works to create emotional bonds that bring a feeling of belonging.
  4. Coaching leader - "Try this": develops people for the future.
  5. Coercive leader - “Do what I tell you”: demands immediate compliance.
  6. Democratic leader - “What do you think?": builds consensus through participation.

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6 Leadership Styles And When You Should Use Them

6 Leadership Styles And When You Should Use Them

https://www.fastcompany.com/1838481/6-leadership-styles-and-when-you-should-use-them

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Peter Drucker

Peter Drucker

"Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things."

Change Leadership Styles

Sometimes a teammate needs a warm hug. Sometimes the team needs a visionary, a new style of coaching, someone to lead the way or even, on occasion, a kick in the bike shorts. 

For that reason, great leaders choose their leadership style like a golfer chooses his or her club, with a calculated analysis of the matter at hand, the end goal and the best tool for the job.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Kurt Lewin's Leadership Styles

Psychologist Kurt Lewin developed his framework in the 1930s, and it provided the foundation of many of the approaches that followed afterwards

  • Autocratic leaders ma...
The Blake-Mouton Managerial Grid
  • With a people-oriented style, you focus on organizing, supporting, and developing your team members. This participatory style encourages good teamwork and creative collaboration.
  • With task-oriented leadership, you focus on getting the job done. You define the work and the roles required, put structures in place, and plan, organize, and monitor work.

The best style to use is one that has both a high concern for people and a high concern for the task.

Path-Goal Theory

With this, you can identify the best leadership approach to use, based on your people's needs, the task that they're doing, and the environment that they're working in.

For example, highly-capable people, who are assigned to a complex task, will need a different leadership approach from people with low ability, who are assigned to an ambiguous task. (The former will want a participative approach, while the latter need to be told what to do.)

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Authentic leadership

Is a management style in which leaders are genuine, self-aware, and transparent. 

An authentic leader is able to inspire loyalty and trust in her employees by consistently display...

Components of Authentic Leadership
  • Self-Awareness: be aware of your trengths, weaknesses, and values and displaying them to your team.
  • Relational Transparency: remain genuine, straightforward, and honest with your team. Display the behavior you hope to see in your employees.
  • Balanced Processing: stick to your values when making decisions, but remain open to discussions and alternatve options.
  • Doing the right thing: focus on doing the right thing for the long-term success of the business, not yours.
3 ways to practie self-awareness as a leader
  • Seek feedback from the environment;
  • Use self-reflection to better understand your behavior;
  • Practice regular self-observation to stay aware of your feelings at all times.
  • Servant leader traits
    • Isn’t concerned about acquiring or holding onto power.
    • Isn’t focused on maintaining a certain reputation above all else.
    • Isn’t obsessed with staying ahead of e...
    How to become a Servant Leader
    1. Be a good listener. Try to determine what the desire of the group or individuals are. 
    2. Practice empathy. Empathy allows you to get past surface issues and to discover what is going on.
    3. Embrace concepts of healing. The servant leader recognizes the brokenness of people and looks for ways to make broken people well.
    4. Be aware of the obvious and the subtle, both in your own life and in other’s lives.
    5. Be persuasive. Use the power of persuasion to help people choose the right path as needed instead of demanding the path.
    6. Be able to conceptualize. Servant leaders are big-picture thinkers, thinking of what their team needs to do to accomplish everything, not just the one thing in front of them.
    7. Be a good steward. A steward is someone who holds onto something and keeps it in good condition for others who need it down the road.
    8. Love the community.
    Servant Leadership Work

    Studies have shown that servant leadership and the empowerment and teamwork that accompay it trickle down. Higher level managers who turn from selfish leadership to selfless leadership end up creating lower-level managers and other employees who then do the same.

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