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How To Brainstorm Like A Googler

Brainstorming guidelines

Brainstorming guidelines
  1. Build on each others’ ideas
  2. Generate lots of ideas. Quantity is more important than quality, so really let loose. 
  3. Write headlines. Being able to describe an idea in less than 6 words helps you clarify it. 
  4. Illustrate. Pictures are usually louder than words and harder to misinterpret.
  5. Think big. Invite bold ideas.
  6. Defer judgment.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How To Brainstorm Like A Googler

https://www.fastcompany.com/3061059/how-to-brainstorm-like-a-googler

fastcompany.com

3

Key Ideas

Building a better brainstorm

Everyone can learn to brainstorm better - it’s a process like any other. 

And the beauty of a process is that it can be taught, learned, and shared. 

How To Brainstorm Like A Googler

  1. Know the user: To solve a big question, you first have to focus on the user you’re solving it for–then everything else will follow. So we go out in the field and talk to people.
  2. Think 10x: It’s about trying to improve something by 10 times rather than by 10%.
  3. Prototype: Take action. You want to strike when the iron is hot–you don’t want to walk away or agree to follow talk with more talk.

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