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4 Steps to Successful Brainstorming

Before heading into a group brainstorming session...

... organizations should insist that staffers first try to come up with their own solutions. 

One problem with group brainstorming is that when we hear someone else’s solution to a problem, we tend to see it as what  an “anchor - we get stuck on that objective and potential solution to the exclusion of other goals.

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4 Steps to Successful Brainstorming

4 Steps to Successful Brainstorming

https://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2013/03/05/4-steps-to-successful-brainstorming/

forbes.com

3

Key Ideas

Steps to Successful Brainstorming

  1. Lay out the problem you want to solve.
  2. Identify the objectives of a possible solution.
  3. Try to generate solutions individually.
  4. Once you have gotten clear on your problems, your objectives and your personal solutions to the problems, work as a group.

Before heading into a group brainstorming session...

... organizations should insist that staffers first try to come up with their own solutions. 

One problem with group brainstorming is that when we hear someone else’s solution to a problem, we tend to see it as what  an “anchor - we get stuck on that objective and potential solution to the exclusion of other goals.

Only after participants have done their homework ...

... meaning clarifying the problem, identifying objectives, and individually trying to come up with solutions, a brainstorming session can be extremely productive.

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When designing your ice breaker, think about the "ice" that needs to be broken.

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  • Clarify the specific objectives for your session.
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  • As a further check, ask yourself how each person is likely to react to the session.

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