The groupthink theory - Deepstash

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How to Brainstorm — Remotely

The groupthink theory

It shows that, during part of the sessions that involves idea generation, individuals think differently about a problem if they work alone. But when you bring the group together to generate ideas, they tend to think alike, converging on a common solution.

So start your brainstorming process by having each person generate potential solutions on their own, or perhaps have them work in small groups to think about possibilities.

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Steps to Successful Brainstorming
  1. Lay out the problem you want to solve.
  2. Identify the objectives of a possible solution.
  3. Try to generate solutions individually.
  4. Once you have gotten...
Before heading into a group brainstorming session...

... organizations should insist that staffers first try to come up with their own solutions. 

One problem with group brainstorming is that when we hear someone else’s solution to a problem, we tend to see it as what  an “anchor - we get stuck on that objective and potential solution to the exclusion of other goals.

Only after participants have done their homework ...

... meaning clarifying the problem, identifying objectives, and individually trying to come up with solutions, a brainstorming session can be extremely productive.

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It helps to be creative and infuse fun into a virtual interaction. Any official conversation, like a manager meeting his subordinates in a one-on-one meeting, can start by asking about the person’s life (something unrelated to work), so that a connection is built.