Idea 4: Gay Parents Raising Children - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Jordan Peterson's 5 most controversial ideas, explained

Idea 4: Gay Parents Raising Children

Peterson believes fathers and children push each other’s limits to “find out where they are.” He cites the fact that kids in a family with a father do better than single-parent families, not citing “families with a mother.” He also believes that a heterosexual nuclear family is the smallest, viable human unit and that going below that comes at a price.

But he admits that women are parents too and that treating gay families in a post-modernist fashion is gerrymandering questions without facing moral responsibilities. In the end, Peterson ignores the power of parental love, the fact that fathers are predominantly at fault for broken homes and that there is no long-term data set on gay families since their acceptance is a recent phenomenon.

42 SAVES


EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Flaw in Jordan Peterson’s Argument On Hierarchy

Peterson suggests human hierarchies aren’t socially created, but are effects of human evolution. His evidence for this is the fact that lobsters also have hierarchies.

Human and lobsters ancestors diverged millions of years before lobsters evolved, so their hierarchy developed independently of human societal structures. Another difference is that lobster hierarchy is mostly determined by biological factors like size and aggressiveness. 

The Flaw In Jordan Peterson’s Comparison Between Humans And Lobsters

Serotonin is linked to aggression and is found in the brains of most animals, humans and lobsters include, as expected of creatures with a common ancestor. But serotonin has a completely different effect in arthropods and vertebrates.

In vertebrates lowered levels of serotonin has been shown to lead to increased aggression, the opposite happens on humans.

Self-Made Millennials

Millennials who claim to be ‘self-made’ get support from their parents and in some cases, enjoy the privilege too, but are reluctant to admit the same. They have to show the world that they are able to do well and sustain themselves on their own, and any conversation around money, privilege, success and class stirs up topics they may try to avoid.


Gender Bias: Women who inherit from their parents and do well are looked upon differently than men who do the same.

The Truth About Millennial Money
  • It’s important to share your real struggles, support and fundings once you find success, or it gives a distorted and false impression to those struggling without any resources. There shouldn’t be a stigma attached to getting help from parents and spouses.
  • It’s imperative to have transparency about money and understand that in any structure of privilege, the people at the top have to take into account what it means to people below them, who are struggling with meagre resources or a network of supporters.
Jordan Peterson

"You’re not as nice as you think. And you’re not as useless as you think"

Jordan Peterson
The Aim of Living
Psychology Professor Jordan Peterson's self-help book 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos provides some out-of-the-box ways of living life, borrowing from the works of Nietzsche, Freud, Jung, and Dostoevsky, which are unconventional sources for this kind of work.
Life as a Tragedy
Jordan Peterson’s view of the world around him is complex, and he tries to simplify this with books.
  • We are just a speck in this huge, complex world, inviting us to be humble. 
  • Happiness, he says, is a pointless goal,
  • Only compare yourself with your yesterday, not with others.