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This 10 Minute TED Talk by Bill Gates Will Teach You Everything You Need to Know About Presenting

Cite examples

When you speak about an idea or process to your audience, you know exactly what you're talking about. But the audience doesn't. 

These concepts can be very abstract without concrete examples to illustrate. Give them examples, and you'll keep their attention.

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This 10 Minute TED Talk by Bill Gates Will Teach You Everything You Need to Know About Presenting

This 10 Minute TED Talk by Bill Gates Will Teach You Everything You Need to Know About Presenting

https://www.inc.com/justin-bariso/this-10-minute-ted-talk-by-bill-gates-will-teach-you-everything-you-need-to-know.html

inc.com

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Key Ideas

Bill Gates presentation style

  • Catching attention with an interesting statement, to build connection with your audience
  • Using gestures
  • Showing investment in the subject
  • Asking effective questions
  • Pausing after making a powerful point and after asking a question
  • When creating slides, thinking: big font, limited text
  • Emphasizing the right word(s)
  • Citing examples
  • Using conclusion to motivate.

Ask effective questions

When you make a statement to your audience, they're passive. Asking questions gets them involved mentally, making them active.


Gestures animate a speech

  • Emphatic gestures: express feeling and conviction;
  • Descriptive gestures: help express action, or to show dimension and location.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

A TED Talk is 18 minutes long
A TED Talk is 18 minutes long

TED curator Chris Anderson explains:
The 18-minute length works much like the way Twitter forces people to be disciplined in what they write. By forcing speakers who are u...

Give a TED-style talk that gets a lot of views
  • Arrange your message onto the 9-up format: same size as sticky notes, until you are happy with the flow.
  • Solicit feedback from effective presenters that you trust to give honest, unfiltered feedback on your narrative and slides.
  • Rehearse with a great (honest) communicator that is not afraid to speak up.
  • Articulate each point clearly.
  • Practice with a clock counting up the minutes, to know how much you're over. Then trim it down.
  • Once you're within the timeframe, practice with a clock counting down. Know where you should be at 6, 12 and 18 minutes.
  • Let your coach jot down what you say well and what you don’t.
  • Don’t be camera shy. Practice by videotaping yourself.
  • Do one more full timed rehearsal right before you walk on stage.
  • Pick two natural places you could stop in your talk, then demarcate those as possible endings.
What makes Obama's speeches memorable
  1. Transcendence. By using concrete and tangible language, he can transport audiences to another place and actually paint a portrait that they can see in their minds’ eye.
  2. Repet...
Observe, Accept, and Reframe

Recognizing and accepting the fact you're being nervous before an important presentation will help you more than trying to fight those anxious feelings. Resistance creates even more angst.

On...

Focus on Your Body

Instead of being swept in the spiral of negative thoughts like 'What if I fail? What will they think of me? try to be aware of your physical sensations: how your heart beats, how the air fills your lungs, the heat and sweat you feel.

This will anchor you in the present moment and calm your nerves.

Tips For Calming Your Nerves
  • Make sure you get a good night’s sleep, that you're hydrated and that you had a good meal before. 
  • Be careful with your caffeine intake before a big presentation so that your heart rate isn’t already elevated.
  • Strike a power pose. Research shows it can shift your mood and make you feel more confident. 
  • Own the space. If you can, get to the room early and really imagine owning it.

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