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7 Things Steve Jobs Can Teach Us About Delivering a Powerful Presentation

Steve Jobs' presentation style

  • A "Tweet-friendly headline" that summarises the product you're presenting: e.g.: "iPod: One thousand songs in your pocket."
  • Showing your passion: He acted excited and used words like "cool" or "amazing".
  • Ditching the power point: He kept the audience's eyeballs on him to keep them engaged.
  • Tailoring to the audience, in a manner that makes them more receptive listeners.
  • Preparing the presentation in advance: He wasn't born being a great communicator, he worked hard at it.

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7 Things Steve Jobs Can Teach Us About Delivering a Powerful Presentation

7 Things Steve Jobs Can Teach Us About Delivering a Powerful Presentation

https://www.inc.com/elle-kaplan/7-tips-to-become-a-master-presenter-like-steve-jobs.html

inc.com

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Key Ideas

Tweet-friendly headlines

Steve Jobs's intro sentences were so great because they clearly outlined what the product did while creating intrigue.

Rather than rambling on, he used them to perfectly convey his message as compactly as possible.

Examples of one sentence summaries of the product he was presenting: "Mac Book Air: the world's thinnest notebook", and "iPod: One thousand songs in your pocket."

Tailor to the audience

Whether you're networking or presenting, it's important to realize that it should never be a one-sided conversation.

Your audience is in the room for a particular reason. It's critical to understand why they're listening to you so you can tune your presentation in a manner that makes them more receptive listeners,

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