Promotion of Position = Demotion of Value - Deepstash

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The Peter Principle, a great management tool | ToolsHero

Promotion of Position = Demotion of Value

Promotion of Position = Demotion of Value

When a person is promoted, they usually turn to different responsibilities and roles which requires completely different skills and insights.

Later on, the company will notice that they made a mistake in choosing the right person but will not want to admit it. As a result, the position will be maintained but will either end up unfilled due to voluntary resignation or imminent dismissal of the person.

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The Peter Principle, a great management tool | ToolsHero

The Peter Principle, a great management tool | ToolsHero

https://www.toolshero.com/management/the-peter-principle/

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Key Ideas

Experience is not everything

Experience is a good thing, but this does not automatically make an employee the best person to be promoted to a more responsible job.

Before promoting an employee, the company should know the employee's level of knowledge, skills and ambitions. They should know if that person really deserves that spot. 

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Peter Principle

It describes what can happen when an employee does well in one job and is subsequently promoted. She/he does well in the new role and is promoted again. This continues up and until the em...

Avoiding the Peter principle
  • Commit to continuous learning: heading off to a career thinking you’ve learned all you needed to know for the next 40-50 years is a sure way to find yourself stuck in a position you cannot move beyond;
  • Be mindful of what you are good at: there are certain career fields each of us know we are not best suited for.
The Peter Principle and Occupational Incompetence
The Peter Principle and Occupational Incompetence

Peter J. Lawrence, whose 1969 bestseller “The Peter Principle” satirically provided many insights on the hows and the whys of incompetents working among us, is now being taken more serious...

Different Competencies

The skills that made a great performer excel, the aggression and the drive, did not translate well when the same performer was in charge of a team, where other skills like people management come into play.

The best teacher of the school cannot be simply promoted as a school principal.

Hiring The Right Person

A manager wouldn’t be able to handle a team of specialists (like Doctors or Scientists) efficiently, without any direct experience. This makes excelling at the current role a huge requirement for anyone being hired as a manager.

A fine balance between the two aspects is required while hiring, with one option being to change the hierarchy of the company itself. The person can be promoted without a typical career ladder, and continue to do his current role, which he is doing well.

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Responses to the Peter Principle

"Women and minorities were exempted from the idea because they often weren’t promoted despite their competence and so didn’t get the chance to r...

A Reverse Peter Principle

Most managers address the bad boss problem by getting out of the subordinate role as quickly as possible and, by improving their own leadership skills, becoming a good boss.

Incompetence is Everywhere

Incompetence can also be seen on how subordinates deal with their bosses.

Workers feel anxious on how their bosses think about them. Should I correct my boss? Does he think of me as a competitor? Am I capable enough? Should I take an action?

Of course, everyone would think of those question before making a move. But a wise subordinate know can recognize that a boss does not know what he needs and the best thing to do is address their suggestions to the boss. Why? Because the boss is the one with the greater power to act.

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