Biohacking drugs - Deepstash

Biohacking drugs

Common reasons for biohacking drugs are that there are not enough cures, that drug prices are too high, and that participating in biohacking is taking a stand against the establishment – primarily Big Pharma.

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MORE IDEAS FROM The dangers of biohacking 'experiments'- and how it could harm your health

Trying to discover drugs through biohacking compromises on quality scientific research.

The drugs usually skip key toxicity tests before being administered to patients and in doing so seriously jeopardises the safety of those involved. Without rigorous pre-clinical testing in the laboratory, it is very difficult to predict how that drug will fully interact with the complexity of the human body.

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Biohacking is an open innovation and social movement that seeks to further enhance the ability of the human body. This includes humans trying to get cyborg like features, achieve hyper human senses, and also seek out new medicines and cures for disease via the promotion of self-experimentation.

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Biohacking: A Primer

Biohacking manipulates one’s brain and body to ‘hack’ it, outside the realm of mainstream science and medicine.

Biohacking, or doing biological activities on oneself, is a broad term and covers stuff like performing ‘Young Blood Transfusion’ or tracking one’s sleep patterns. It took wings from Silicon Valley, where people started broadcasting their intermittent fasting, crazy diets, DNA injecting and the popular dopamine fasting.

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Placebo's as pleasing treatments: History of the concept
  • Plato's cure for headaches involved a leaf coupled with a charm. Without uttering the charm at the moment of application, the remedy was not effective. We would call Plato's "charm" a placebo.
  • In the 18th century, the term "placebo" was used to describe a doctor. In his 1763 book, Dr Pierce describes a visit to his sick friend, saying that he found "Dr Placebo" sitting at her bedside. She said she was well, and Pierce seems to imply that the positive effect Dr Placebo had was due to his great bedside manner, rather than the drops he gave.
  • Eventually, the word "placebo" started being used to describe treatments. In 1752, the Scottish obstetrician William Smellie used some innocent Placemus that his patient "may take between whiles, to beguile the time and please her imagination."

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Molecular Farming: Possible Future For Vaccines.

Using genetic engineering and synthetic biology, scientists can introduce brand new biochemical pathways into plant cells—or even whole plants—essentially turning them into single-use bioreactors.

The whole idea has a retro-futuristic science fiction vibe. First conceived of in 1986, molecular farming got its boost three decades later, when the FDA approved the first—and only—plant-derived therapeutic protein for humans to treat Gaucher disease, a genetic disorder that prevents people from breaking down fats.

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