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Self Improvement

Cons of the KonMari Method

  1. This process may not be realistic for larger spaces or families: This guide is written from the point of view of a single woman in her early 30's who lives in a small flat in Japan.
  2. Category sorting may not be as effective if you have a family.
  3. Untagging clothes and immediately hanging them in your closet doesn't always make sense.
  4. The book doesn't address how to deal with children's toys.

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

If you're single, or a couple with a small pet in a tiny apartment it may work. But if you're a large family in a larger space you'll have to pick and choose what works otherwise outsource some of the work.

  1. Decluttering in one shot allows for immediate transformation: If you tidy a little at a time, you would tidy forever because you wouldn't see the drastic results.
  2. Sorting by category instead of by room can save you time.
  3. The emphasis is keeping only what "sparks joy": Will help you better decide what to keep, and also give you a greater appreciation for what you have.
  4. You let go of your stuff with gratitude for the usefulness they served

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

RELATED IDEAS

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IDEAS

Declutter Your World

Takumi Kawahara and Marie Kondo, a couple from Japan, are co-founders of KonMari Media. They have a bestseller (authored by Kondo) about decluttering and cleaning your world, and also a highly popular Netflix series of the same topic: Decluttering and Cleaning.

The Netflix Show ‘Tidying Up with Marie Kondo’ is the most-watched non-fiction show on the platform. She is now at par with Martha Stewart, Oprah, and Gwyneth Paltrow, as a goddess of wellness and domesticity.

She has an e-commerce website, blog, newsletter, and does consultation work in over 40 countries through her personally created brand. 

Marie Kondo’s decluttering philosophy, which became a rage, invited critics to label her as someone who has an anti-capitalist agenda that can cripple the economy. 

She was also labeled as someone who only appeals to the rich. This unwanted attention resulted in even more business opportunities.

The commitment and pure dedication of Marie Kondo are evident in her body language and facial expressions and is a huge driver of the appeal of the Netflix show.

Kondo’s decluttering techniques are highly sought after, resulting in unprecedented growth and demand, including items for sale that ‘spark joy’, available on her online store.

Along with the of conquering the corporate world, Kondo is also focussing on kids, by providing educational material, flashcards and even a picture book aimed at educating kids to sort and declutter. By introducing these habits early in children’s lives, kids will avoid the problem altogether.

 The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing
It explores how putting your space in order causes correspondingly dramatic changes in lifestyle and perspective.

Marie Kondo, the author, recommends that you start by discarding and only then thoroughly organize your space in one go.

The problem with storage

Putting things away creates the illusion that the clutter problem has been solved.

Organizing all your junk better does not equal getting rid of clutter. And unfortunately most people leap at storage methods that promise quick and convenient ways to remove visible clutter.

Tidy by category, not by location

For example, set goals like “clothes today, books tomorrow.” 

We often store the same type of item in more than one place and when we tidy each place separately, we fail to see that we’re repeating the same work in many locations. 

2 essential actions of tidying
  1. Discarding - getting rid of everything you don’t need, by asking “Does this spark joy?”, while holding the items, one by one;
  2. Deciding where to store things;
Cluttered digital lives

If people's physical lives were anywhere near as cluttered as their digital lives, their kitchen sinks would be full of dishes, their closets would be jammed, and their houses would be in chaos.

But our digital lives are limited to our devices, so we don't notice how messy they are. Our news feeds are filled with updates we don't care about. We're subscribed to 100 podcasts but listen to only a few.

We can reclaim our time and our attention. Unlike a physical space, we can wipe the slate clean in our digital environment.

If you clear apps from your phone, nothing will happen. You can always reinstall the ones you use.

Digital Declutter
  • Clear your browser history.
  • Unsubscribe from newsletters, podcasts, blogs, and anything else you consume.
  • Delete all the apps that are currently on your phone and desktop or laptop (as long as you don’t have to buy a new version of anything).

To find out what to keep, determine how much value something is adding to your life.
Decide which are "optional" that you can take a break from for thirty days. As a rule, consider the technology optional unless its temporary removal would harm your life.

If you want to reduce the impact of distractions, design an environment conducive to thatWillpower doesn't work. Checking email or Facebook is an impulse, not a choice.

  • Use a Distraction Blocker.
  • Work in Full-screen mode.
  • Leave your phone out of the room.
  • Keep your inbox closed by default.

Every app you use, social network you join, link you click, blog you read, podcast you consume impacts your mindset and thinking. 

  • Does it make you happier?
  • More productive?
  • Successful?
  • Speak to your heart?

If the answer is no, don't allow it into your world.

Most people do not consume content deliberately. They just click on whatever moves through their feed.

Deliberate consumption means you consume what you decide on beforehand. If you consume less and are intentional about it, you'll get more out of the content you consume.

  • Carry a physical notebook. It's a distraction-free tool.
  • Read physical books. We retain more when we read physical books.
  • Meet people in person. The digital to human contact ratio in most of our lives are entirely out of balance.

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