Laughing at yourself to manage stress better - Deepstash
Laughing at yourself to manage stress better

Laughing at yourself to manage stress better

Finding humor in our goof-ups and weirdness helps us take life less seriously & reduces stress. It promotes positive interpersonal interactions and relationships.

According to Harvard Gazette, 2008, J. K. Rowling was at Harvard University on June 5 that year. She began her address as the commencement speaker by saying, "The first thing I would like to say is ‘thank you.’ Not only has Harvard given me an extraordinary honor, but the weeks of fear and nausea I have endured at the thought of giving this commencement address have made me lose weight. A win-win situation!"

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Laughing at yourself to connect better with people

Disclosing funny things or weaknesses about oneself can reduce tension and anxiety for you and the other person.

It makes others feel comfortable because you are self-accepting. It breaks down barriers and makes people realize each other’s similarities, makes us relatable, and builds rapport.

But remember not to be cynical because too self-deprecating humor makes people feel uncomfortable. It shows the possibility of underlying emotional problems like low self-esteem.

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Benefits of self-directed laughter

Self-directed laughter helps maintain positive mental health during stressful times, diffuses a tense situation, and brings the focus back to what's more important.

Psychologists call laughing at oneself, “self-directed laughter” - having insight while still having a sense of self-acceptance. Laughing at yourself is good for your wellbeing if you can:

  • look at your weaknesses & mistakes with compassion.
  • laugh without putting yourself down. 
  • see the funny side of embarassing situations.

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Morning Phototherapy involves exposure to bright light upon awakening. It helps to increase morning alertness and advances the sleep phase in the evening. An inexpensive way to get exposure to bright light (depending on weather conditions, the location and season of the year) is to open the window shades or take a walk in the bright morning sun. Alternatively a specially designed bright light box may be prescribed. These boxes provide between 2,500 and 10,000 lux . Depending on the brightness level, they are used for periods of 30 min to 2 hours. Precise timing of use is critical and is related to the core body temperature minimum. The light is administered about 30 minutes earlier every other day to help gradually advance evening sleep onset. This treatment can be effective in 2 to 3 weeks when combined with evening light avoidance, but often requires ongoing treatment to maintain gains.

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