Consider this experiment. - Deepstash
Persuasive storytelling

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Persuasive storytelling

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Consider this experiment.

Consider this experiment.

In one study, the authors designed a fictional mountain gear brand and a fictional sushi restaurant. Each fake brand was given two different logos: one descriptive and one abstract.

For instance, the mountain gear brand’s descriptive logo had an image of a mountain on it, and the sushi restaurant featured a sushi roll.

In the abstract versions, these shapes were changed to a black triangle for the mountain and a black cylinder for the sushi.

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Which one won?

Which one won?

The nondescriptive, geometric versions sound so modern, with enticing, flat design! They must be the better way to go, right?

In fact, subjects preferred the companies with the more l...

24

193 reads

Who has a better logo?

Who has a better logo?

McDonald’s is the more successful company by a mile, and its golden arches are recognizable from blocks away. But at according to a new paper published in the Journal of Marketing Research, Burger King has a bett...

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407 reads

But why?

But why?

According to the research, people respond more positively—meaning they consider brands more authentic and worthy of their money—when they have descriptive logos rather than abstract, “non-descriptive” ones like the McDonald’s arches, or even the Nike swoosh.

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250 reads

Abstraction may work with a broad range of services.

Abstraction may work with a broad range of services.

Finally, the researchers speculate that brands with a broad reach of services, like Uber or Procter & Gamble, probably benefit from more abstract symbols that don’t pin them down to a single product offe...

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215 reads

Not every brand should be descriptive.

Not every brand should be descriptive.

There are cases, the researchers found, where descriptive logos are the wrong way to go—namely, if consumers don’t like your product.

In other words, if someone is buying palm oil—or perhaps bug repellent, or a funeral home service, as the authors write—keep dead bodies...

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167 reads

CURATED FROM

CURATED BY

heisenberg

Digital marketing at dentsu. Invested in the symbiosis of marketing, psychology, and design. Photographer at heart.

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