They Think Long Term and Promote This Thinking

They Think Long Term and Promote This Thinking

They prioritize long-term gains over short-term wins even if that is unpopular and causes immediate pain. They do that because they realize that it takes time to achieve key results.

The pursuit of short-term gains can harm your long-term strategy. Winning, in the long run, requires letting go of short-term jumps.

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5 Uncommon Things Great Leaders Do

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They Focus on Their Team's Personal Growth

Good leaders know that unless their team members get better than what they were yesterday, they won’t achieve the higher goals set today. And if they aren’t achieving higher goals each year, they are stagnating.

These leaders work with their team members to help them achieve personal growth along with professional growth. Both of these are independent and they won't be able to succeed at work without improving every day.

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They Don't Have an Open Door Policy

We've moved away from the rigidly hierarchical structures of the past decades. Employees aren't hesitant to reach out to their leaders anymore. Open-door policies are not only redundant, but they can also be extremely distracting.

Great leaders understand that and do not have an open-door policy anymore. They do that to protect their and their team's focus and to help them become independent. 

They set up great processes and protocols to enhance communication instead.

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5 Uncommon Things Great Leaders Do

Whenever someone talks about good leadership traits, we immediately think about things like charisma, communications skills, delegation, and leading by example.

While those skills are important, there are some other significant traits that get completely lost. Let's see what those are.

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They Aren't Afraid to Expose Their Vulnerability & Ignorance

No one is perfect or bereft of weaknesses. Great leaders know that.

They don't shy away from that and are quite upfront in admitting those. They do that to make their team aware and, more importantly, have their team members complement them and fill those gaps collectively as a unit.

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They Obsess over Process & Execution and Not over Outcomes

Good leaders focus on setting winning processes and pursue superlative execution. They understand that if these are set right, results are bound to follow.

They understand that if results are not up to the mark, even if the execution is spot on, it is their responsibility, more than their team members, to get it right.

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Great problem solvers approach each new problem as though it were brand new. 

That way they can apply a specific solution to the problem instead of a fix that may go only partway.

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Leadership is knowing how to get the most out of a team, identifying the right set of goals to complete and setting direction. In business this is also known as “vision” as it’s more about knowing what is important then how to achieve it.

Good leadership assembles a competent team who share the vision regarding the goal, makes informed adjustments to it and mediates conflicts. All this while observing the ever-changing motivating forces of each team member, motivating, delegating and, when appropriate, interfering.

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The amount of data generated doubles every two years, reflecting a 50-fold growth from 2010 to 2020.

To thrive in this rapidly changing environment, leaders must evolve quickly or risk extinction. Leaders need to possess the skills to read the ever-changing landscape, to create flexible teams and inspire their companies to solve big problems.

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Five Rules for Leading in a Digital World

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