Working virtually is taxing

Working virtually is taxing
  • Since shifting into a more virtual work situation our workday has been proven to be lengthed by more than an hour and meetings extended for a full 10 minutes longer.
  • As we feed into these longer working hours it causes us to have higher chances for cognitive overhead. We may not be aware of it but our brains aren't wired to look at a flat image of a person on a grid.
  • Our brain produces beta waves every time we process a lot of information at once and then our brain starts to slow down.
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@juan_bb

Time Management

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Short-term fixes for cognitive dysfunction
  • In order to reduce the beta waves our brain makes, it's important to take a break here and there and do something that will relax your brain - preferably not involving a screen.
  • By doing so, your brain will begin to produce alpha waves. We'll become more and engaged and focused on our tasks.
  • When we take breaks it allows us to rest and maintain better brain health throughout the day because it helps restore alpha waves which restore our cognitive function.
Taking strides forward on virtual workings

So that we may be able to make a significant change we must reassess the way we communicate with each other at work.

Many schedule wasteful meetings that are evidently not helpful most of the time. In order to reduce overworking, we need to communicate policies and expectations to workers clearly but this doesn't mean we should micromanage them.

When we end presenteeism in our work culture, we are establishing a healthier habit of knowing when to log off.

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Why Zoom Calls Drain Us
  • Video calls require more focus than face-to-face chatting. We have to pay more attention to process the non-verbal cues like tone, pitch, body language and facial expressions. There is also a feeling of dissonance when the minds are together but the bodies are physically apart.
  • One finds it harder to relax in a conversation, as even a slight delay (silence) makes us feel that the other person is not friendly or focused enough. 

The reason Zoom calls drain your energy

bbc.com

Digital Mirrors

As more and more interaction goes online due to work being increasingly remote, we find that we are staring at our digital selves on the laptop or smartphone screen more often than usual. Social scientists are looking at the long-term effects of being connected via screens in our homes, isolated from real people.

If we like ourselves, we would find pleasure in being on video calls, but if we are self-critical, the same negative feelings would be amplified. The screens act like digital mirrors, showing us more of what we believe in.

I can’t stop staring at my own face on Zoom - Experience Magazine

expmag.com

Any kind of exercise, be it aerobic, walking or Yoga, changes the brain's composition, structure and the way it operates. The changes that happen to the brain:

  • Brain waves increase
  • Increased sensitivity to surroundings
  • The building of neurotransmitters and increased neuro-connections
  • De-ageing.

This Is Your Brain on Exercise

outsideonline.com

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