The Danger Of The 2—Minute Rule - Deepstash

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Use the Two Minute Rule to Stop Procrastinating and Get Things Done

The Danger Of The 2—Minute Rule

It’s easy to loose track of time after starting a 2-minute task. Although it’s a good thing that you can immerse yourself in a task that you had to use the 2-minute rule to begin with, losing track of time may leave you behind on everything else.

Pay attention to your schedule and prioritize properly.

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Use the Two Minute Rule to Stop Procrastinating and Get Things Done

Use the Two Minute Rule to Stop Procrastinating and Get Things Done

https://lifehacker.com/use-the-two-minute-rule-to-stop-procrastinating-and-get-1521792128

lifehacker.com

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Key Ideas

The Danger Of The 2—Minute Rule

It’s easy to loose track of time after starting a 2-minute task. Although it’s a good thing that you can immerse yourself in a task that you had to use the 2-minute rule to begin with, losing track of time may leave you behind on everything else.

Pay attention to your schedule and prioritize properly.

The Benefits Of The 2-Minute Rule

  • If you're trying to build new habits and skills, making every step of the way an easily achievable 2-minute chunk, will make you more likely to do it over and over again.
  • The 2–Minute Rule works for big goals as well as small goals because of the inertia of life. Once you start doing something, it’s easier to continue doing it. It also teaches you to get to the point of getting things done.

The 2-Minute Rule

  • If you can do it in less than two minutes, do it now (assuming you have no other, bigger priorities at the moment.)
  • When you start a new habit, make your goals into 2-minute bites, so they're easy to do any time.

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The Reasoning Behind The 2–Minute Rule

The 2–Minute Rule overcomes procrastination by automating the decision-making process, making it so easy to start taking action that you can’t say no.

It consists of breaking down t...

The 2 Steps Of The 2-Minute Rule
  1. If it takes less than 2 minutes, then do it now.
  2. When you start a new habit, it should take less than two minutes to do.
Habits And The 2–Minute Rule

The 2–Minute Rule allows you to develop a process of consistently taking action, regardless of goal achievement. The focus is on taking action and letting things flow from there.

The 2–Minute Rule works for big and small goals because of the inertia of life. Once you start doing something, it’s easier to continue doing it. And beginning is the hardest part of a new habit — not just the first time, but each time.

If the 2-Minute Rule feels forced to you

... try this: do something you want to make into a habit for 2 minutes and then stop. And keep repeating.

This reinforces the identity you want to build and, eventually, you will feel ...

Why The 2-Minute Rule Works

The point is not to do one thing, but to master the habit of showing up. A habit must be established before it can be improved. 

Mastering the art of showing up, the first 2 minutes become a ritual at the beginning of a larger routine. This is the ideal way to master a difficult skill. The more you ritualize the beginning of a process, the more likely it becomes that you can slip into the state of deep focus that is required to do great things. 

Stop Procrastinating With the “2-Minute Rule”

The Rule states “When you start a new habit, it should take less than 2 minutes to do. So break down your habits into tasks that can be accomplished within 2 minutes.

The idea is to make your habits as easy as possible to start. Making a task from a habit short makes it feel less like a challenge and it works as a “gateway habit” that leads you down a more productive path.

The Two-Minute Rule

It helps you decide when to tackle a task by following the steps below:

  1. Define clearly what is the task and the actions that compose it.
  2. If the action takes less...
The “one-minute rule”
The “one-minute rule”

With this rule, you do anything that presents itself, right away, as long as you can do it in a minute: Hang up your coat, read a letter and toss it, fill in a form, answer an email, note down a ci...

Productivity and priorities

One nice thing about the “one-minute rule” is that you don’t have to think about priorities, because you do anything that presents itself, right away.

And your productivity will shot up because you get so many little things got done quickly, so you'll have more time for the bigger tasks.

Scott Hanselman

"Hope is not a plan. Hope is nothing but waiting and letting life happen to you."

Scott Hanselman
Effectiveness Vs Efficiency
  • Effectiveness is goal orientation. It's picking something to do. This is doing the right things—picking a goal and doing that goal.
  • Efficiency is doing things in an economical way, process-oriented.
Scott Hanselman
Scott Hanselman

"Effectiveness is doing the right things, but efficiency is doing things right. That means effectiveness is picking a direction and efficiency is running really fast in that direction."

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Getting Things Done: the basics
  • Capture. Write down everything you need to do.
  • Clarify. Break down each task into an actionable next step. 
  • Organize. Move each of those actionable ta...
The 2-minute rule
If a task takes less than 2 minutes, then do it now.

If the effort to keep remembering a task is more than just getting it out of the way now, then do it.

Fixing small tasks
  • Fixing things is empowering. Our confidence increases or decreases based on our ability to make progress. 
  • Any progress builds momentum (and your mood): No matter how small the task is, crossing it off your to-do list gives you a boost of momentum and enhances your mood.
  • Small steps turn into habits: When a task is easy to do and quickly completed, it’s much easier to turn it into a habit.

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Overthinking

It  means overanalyzing something that happened, regretting an action, or worrying about the future of something. 

It's when you can't think about anything else, and it'...

Overthinking and action

If you're overthinking an idea you can actually do something about, the best thing you can do is take action now.

This doesn't mean you have to suddenly run off to make something, it just means you start taking a step forward. We tend to overthink because we fear failure, but if we just start working, that dissipates quickly

Break the circle of overthinking:
  • Relabel the ideas you're overthinking ("self-doubt," "anxiety," etc)
  • Reframe your experience and identify your thinking errors
  • Refocus your attention on the part that matters
  • Revalue your brain's messages with the new information