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4 Lessons in Storytelling From Walt Disney - Museum Hack

Bring People Into Your World

Walt Disney took suspension of reality a step further building theme parks that brought people into his world. You can bring people into your world through storytelling and brand activation.

Brand activation is when you combine storytelling with unique experiences to increase awareness and engagement with your company.

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4 Lessons in Storytelling From Walt Disney - Museum Hack

4 Lessons in Storytelling From Walt Disney - Museum Hack

https://museumhack.com/disney-storytelling/

museumhack.com

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Key Ideas

Suspend Reality

Suspending reality is a powerful storytelling technique as it creates a safe, magical world in which to contend with powerful emotions and themes, and it allows the viewer or listener to be transported and associate that escape from reality with the story.

Anything is possible and that becomes inspiration.

Focus on Shared Desires

Disney stories have a near universal appeal because they are designed around struggles and desires that are common to humans everywhere.

You can apply this message to storytelling in your company, too. When you’re communicating with your customers, you should focus on the shared experiences and desires that make your product so valuable.

Stories Are a Powerful Investment Tool

In a corporate context, storytelling can invest your employees in your next undertaking, or your clients in the value of your product.

People were skeptical of the feasibility of a movie in the unprecedented scale of Snow White. Walt Disney convinced investors and animators by inviting them to a play where he acted out the entire story of Snow White and the Seven Dwarves. He convinced people of the movie’s value, even though it seemed like a wild and crazy proposition.

Storytelling

Is the activity of writing or telling stories and can empower one to convey a message in the strongest possible way. It’s a cultural and social activity that stimulates the imagination and builds a sense of wonder and community between teller and listener(s). 

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Better Your Storytelling With Emotion And Reaction

Though a cartoon is two-dimensional, to make an emotional connection with the audience characters need action and re-action. Walt Disney had his artists focus on learning that.

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Keep The Audience’s Perception In Mind

Walt Disney realized that to tell the best stories he had to invest in teaching his artists how to be the best if he wanted his movies to be the best. They then invested more and created their own schools.

We need to be less concerned about how we look at our stories and instead focus on the images we draw in the minds of our audience. We use words to do that and they need just enough detail to let the minds of the audience to paint an image but not so much that we confuse the image in their mind.

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Storytelling Is Everything

Whether it's telling inspiring stories to customers or delivering a presentation to executives and the board of directors, being a good storyteller helps us make the leap from Good to Great.

Product managers and designers can benefit tremendously by great storytelling, and so can anyone who is working with product design.

Purpose

Instead of selling products, we need to focus on their purpose and what good it does for the end-user. Focus on the need of the customer and design the product around it.

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Storytelling is...
Storytelling is...
...the process of using fact and narrative to communicate something to your audience. Some stories are factual, and some are embellished or improvised in order to better explain the core message.
Why we tell stories
  • Stories solidify abstract concepts and simplify complex messages;
  • Stories bring people together: stories connect us through the way we feel and respond to them;
  • Stories inspire and motivate, by tapping into people’s emotions and baring both the good and bad.
Good stories are …
  • Entertaining. Good stories keep the reader engaged and interested in what’s coming next.
  • Educational. Good stories spark curiosity and add to the reader’s knowledge bank.
  • Universal. Good stories are relatable to all readers and tap into emotions and experiences that most people undergo.
  • Organized. Good stories follow a succinct organization that helps convey the core message and helps readers absorb it.
  • Memorable. Whether through inspiration, scandal, or humor, good stories stick in the reader’s mind.

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