The utility fallacy - Deepstash

The utility fallacy

Is the tendency, when evaluating the impact of a technology, to confine your attention to comparing the technical features of the new technology to what it replaced.

For example: No one argues that it’s better to send an email than a fax. But the modern knowledge worker now sends 125 business emails a day, which works out to one every 3.85 minutes —more back-and-forth communication than what was common in the pre-email era. This new behavior is not “better” in any useful sense.

STASHED IN:

40

STASHED IN:

0 Comments

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEA

Digital minimalism

It means using technology with more intention and purpose.

It's a “philosophy of technology use” rooted in reclaiming control and intention back from the devices and platforms that have hijacked it.

 You figure out what's valuable to you.  And then you happily miss out on everything else.

STASHED IN:

154

Cluttered digital lives

If people's physical lives were anywhere near as cluttered as their digital lives, their kitchen sinks would be full of dishes, their closets would be jammed, and their houses would be in chaos.

But our digital lives are limited to our devices, so we don't notice how messy they are. Our news feeds are filled with updates we don't care about. We're subscribed to 100 podcasts but listen to only a few.

4

STASHED IN:

253

Research found that only 7 percent of communication comes from the words you use; the rest of what you communicate comes from your voice and tone (38 percent) and your body language (55 percent).

So that means when you send a virtual message, 93 percent of what you’re trying to communicate may be lost.

8

STASHED IN:

517