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On the Utility Fallacy

http://www.calnewport.com/blog/2019/05/06/on-the-utility-fallacy/

calnewport.com

On the Utility Fallacy
May 6th, 2019 · 20 comments A few years ago, I wrote an article for the Harvard Business Review's website about the excesses of email culture. In an effort to destabilize the perceived necessity of our current moment of hyperactive communication, I explored a thought experiment in which email was banished altogether and replaced with pre-scheduled office hours.

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The utility fallacy

Is the tendency, when evaluating the impact of a technology, to confine your attention to comparing the technical features of the new technology to what it replaced.

For example: No...

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Digital minimalism

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Techno-maximalism

It promtes the basic idea that technological innovations can bring value and convenience into your life.

It just looks at the positives. And it's view is more is better than less, because more things that bring you benefits means more total benefits. 

Putting FOMO into perspective

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Most companies embracing remote work also have dedicated headquarters. But remote-ish teams have even more communication and collaboration challenges than fully remote teams.

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Remote-friendly vs remote-first

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Connecting a remote-ish team

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Surviving Screens In Isolation

There are many people self-isolating due to the escalating pandemic, with their phones being the essential link to the outside world. Technology becomes a double-edged sword, connecting and isolating us at the same time, leading to anxiety-related disorders, and extremely short attention spans.

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