The 30-Day Trial - Deepstash

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The 30-Day Trial

The 30-Day Trial

You commit to some change for 30 days, then tou can go back to your old ways. But having spent thirty days applying a new behavior is often enough to convince you to stick with it.

Pros:

  • Can handle more significant/difficult behavior changes you might be unlikely to start with a perpetual commitment.
  • Fosters an experimental mindset, rather than assuming you already know what’s best.

Cons:

  • 30 days probably isn’t enough to actually make something a habit.
  • Without a long-term plan, many 30-day trials will revert back to the original behavior.

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MORE IDEAS FROM THE SAME ARTICLE

Ignore the process of creating habits altogether and simply focus on a project that will force them to occur.

2 main ways you can condition a habit:

This strategy works by deputizing others to enforce your habit for you.

Avoid thinking about changing a habit, but instead think about changing your self-conception.

The goal is to do it every day (if possible) but if you miss a day, you must do the habit the following day.

Keep track of how many days in a row you’ve successfully followed your habit. As your chain gets longer and longer, you become increasingly committed to the habit.

The basic process for building all habits is basically the same: you repeatedly condition the behavior you want, over time, until it becomes automatic.

It means practicing the habit a bunch of times in an artificial situation so that it occurs more automatically in real life.

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