The lazy coworker - Deepstash

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How To Handle The Most Awkward Situations

The lazy coworker

If you’re working with someone who isn’t pulling their weight, the key to solving this issue is to not give them too many chances.

Explain to your coworker that the project is important to you, and you want to make sure you both see things the same way. Also, talk about your needs instead of their faults.

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Conflict with bad coworkers

Having a bad coworker can really hamper your mood over the long haul, as well as your job performance. 

How you deal with that conflict could very well be the difference between having a good job and having a bad job.

Accept and Acknowledge Personality Differences

Small tics will be magnified and personality differences lead to varying work styles, which can easily turn into conflict.

Conflict can even arise from something as simple as you desiring a quiet lunch period, while your coworkers like to socialize. These types of things are simply differences in how you work or socialize, and don’t necessarily make your coworkers bad.

Know the Pros and Cons of the Work Culture

Some work cultures are notoriously demanding and competitive, which can obviously lead to a lot of conflict.

In a sales environment where folks are competing for commissions and bonuses, it’s understandable that not everyone would be over-the-top friendly with each other. You should consider whether you might be misinterpreting behavior or overreacting to it.

Awkward Work Scenarios
Awkward Work Scenarios
  1. Others taking credit for your work: speak up when presenting your joint ideas, else the boss will remember that the other was the one who did all the talking.
  2. Overanalyzing your tone or watering down criticism: understand the difference between sounding arrogant and assertive.
  3. Noisy coworkers: work somewhere else in the office or record the noises that you make during a workday—maybe the noises aren’t as bad as you think.
  4. Beign interrupted during meetings: to speak with authority and presence you need to feel worth listening to, and you can develop it for yourself.
  5. Making friends in the office: invite a coworker to lunch or ask to join a group of them. People are often happy to have new additions.
  6. Firing a hard worker that isn’t good enough: set clear benchmarks, and let them know what will happen if they don’t meet them.
  7. You want to leave early but others work late: talk to your boss if there is no reason for the extra time.
  8. Your employees don’t respect you: project confidence in your new role, then be specific and clear about your expectations.
  9. Interviewing while pregnant: it’s an opportunity to show your resourcefulness and preparation. Be ready with a plan for minimizing the impact of your absence.
  10. You don't want to attend to happy hour: try coming up with some time during work to bond–like lunch or family-friendly weekend events.
The weirdness of it
The weirdness of it

Reaching out privately to a colleague can feel weird because making the active decision to initiate a conversation usually creates the expectation that you want something.
So explain why you're reaching out. Always give a reason why you want to talk to someone. Also, send one message, then wait for a response. And if someone continually doesn't respond when you reach out, take the hint.

Reach out

Reaching out and offering your help to a new colleague, for example, is a great way to start a conversation.
It can feel weird, but in a remote setup, this is the only way these chats will happen.

Respond privately

A great way to start a conversation with a teammate is to respond privately to comments made in public channels.
For example:

  • Your comment was very funny!
  • Great job on solving that tricky issue!
  • Thank you for answering my question, I appreciate your perspective.