Constraints and the Power to Unlock Creativity - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

Constraints and the Power to Unlock Creativity

https://writingcooperative.com/constraints-and-the-power-to-unlock-creativity-f77ca2026805

writingcooperative.com

Constraints and the Power to Unlock Creativity
When the blank page overpowers you, you need to make yourself bigger… or make the challenge smaller. There is a very simple trick to do that: constraints.

4

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Constraints For Creativity

Constraints For Creativity

Limitations, constraints and deadlines, paradoxically help us unlock our latent creativity. They help us try the untested, take the risk and explore stuff we normally would not.

Constraints act as rules and guidelines that work for you in a positive way, whether you understand them or not.

292 SAVES

739 READS

VIEW

Freedom From Paralysis

While too many constraints and rules are counterproductive, a balanced level of constraints helps creativity. Clearly stated constraints help us plan our scope of work and the amount of effort that has to be put.

Example: A pre-existing constraint with an employer of providing a two-page CV along with the cover letter help us draft the same with the limitations in mind.

219 SAVES

621 READS

Marissa Mayer

“Creativity is often misunderstood. People often think of it in terms of artistic work — unbridled, unguided effort that leads to beautiful effect. If you look deeper, however, you’ll find that some of the most inspiring art forms — haikus, sonatas, religious paintings — are fraught with constraints.”

Marissa Mayer

269 SAVES

633 READS

For All Budding Writers

Applying constraints is like stoking the fires of creativity for writers:

  • Embrace some arbitrary rules, and add some more if that doesn’t work. Remove some rules if it feels limiting.
  • Get some inspiration from other writings, avoiding any real or perceived plagiarism. Even if it is a copy, it will provide you with a kickstart, and can be removed later.
  • Make up some crazy constraints and go into unchartered territory
  • Stay calm and let creativity find its way.

255 SAVES

664 READS

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Be a Game Master

Be a Game Master
Attach rewards to your to do list. 
  • Reward yourself for fulfilling one or several tasks

Use surprise rewards.

  • Determine a reward by chance.

Gamify Your Business

Product Gamification

  • Add new features to a product to make it addictive when used.

Marketing Gamification

  • Gamify experiences to increase loyalty among existing clients.

Workplace Gamification 

  • Train employees and help them grow into a leader.

Gamify Your Life with Apps

  • Do It Now (RPG To Do List)
  • Habitica/HabitRPG (Boosts General Productivity)
  • MindSnacks (Language Learning Apps)
  • SuperBetter (App for Tracking a Single Difficult Goal)
  • Fitocracy (Workout Fitness Log)
  • Productivity Challenge Timer
  • LifeRPG (Task List Based on a Mission-Oriented Approach)
  • EpicWin (RPG-Style To-Do List)
  • Life Strategy (Life Managing App)
  • Thirty – Get Inspired (Habit-Building App)

2 more ideas

The Better Mind Map

The Better Mind Map

Combining the Mind Map Technique with the Creativity Triggers Technique.

The novelty of The Better Mind Map is in the custom triggers tailored to a specific challenge. It is a t...

How The Better Mind Map works

  • Write your design challenge or problem in the center of a blank piece of paper and circle it.
  • Add the following five Topic Areas around the central challenge: User needs, Inspiration, Constraints, Commercial drivers, Service design triggers.
  • In the Service design triggers Area, Pick 3 triggers from Entertainment, Simplified/light, Adaptable, Economical, Integrated, Durable.
  • Consolidate what you know about each topic area into 3 triggers each.

Sketching ideas

From your mind map:
  • Divide a piece of paper into six sections.
  • Dedicate each section to a sketched idea, based on a single trigger from your Better Mind Map

Commit

Gratitude doesn’t seem to come as easily as grumbling does, and you will likely resist this exercise. Waiting for the resistance to pass is futile. Just do it.

Begin

Sit down with pen and paper or at your computer and start, “I am grateful for …” 

Your gratitude list is a bridge across those troubled waters to a resting place on the other side.

Practice present-moment gratitude

As you move through your day, pause now and then when you remember and think as you do something “I am grateful.”

Moving through your day with awareness and grace in this way will mean that when you do sit down to write your gratitude list those things will come to mind.