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How to Feel Better When You Don’t Know What’s Wrong

https://www.raptitude.com/2020/06/how-to-feel-better-when-you-dont-know-whats-wrong/

raptitude.com

How to Feel Better When You Don’t Know What’s Wrong
Where I live, “How are you?” has traditionally been more of a greeting than a question. You’re supposed to say something like, “Good! You?” and then talk about whatever you were going to talk about. In the last three months, […]

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The Fragility of Ordinary Life

The Fragility of Ordinary Life

Our modern lives are only made stable by a surprisingly fragile configuration of routines. When one or more parts is broken, problems appear everywhere. And even the most bland adjustment could throw things off.

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When You Don't Know What's Wrong

Solving a problem is very difficult when its cause is hard to trace. You can’t isolate the trouble the same way you would dunk a leaky inner tube into a bathtub to see where the bubbles come out, for example.

What you can do is try to focus on better inputs: i.e, if you're struggling because of the pandemic and its social and health consequences, try pouring more vegetables, books, and exercise into the front end of the system, while reducing the intake of sugar, Netflix, and news.

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Feel-good activities

There are 2 types of feel-better activities:

  • Those that immediately improve your mood, but often at the expense of overall well-being. Easy to start doing, and often hard to stop, they tend not to have long-term rewards.
  • Those are activities that improve your well-being, and your mood too, but usually not right away. You never regret these activities and they take effort.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Prisoner's Dilemma

The Prisoner's Dilemma

It is a famous thought experiment in Game Theory. Two prisoners in separate interrogation rooms have two options: to confess or to lie, and this can lead to three outcomes:

  1. If both c...

The Millennials Dilemma

The Prisoners Dilemma can be reimagined as a life-optimization matrix. When two people have some free time due to a time-saving technique, they can spend it either on leisure or further work. This can have three outcomes:

  1. Both individuals choose to work harder in their free time, remaining in a constant state of acceleration
  2. Both individuals choose to relax and chill out.
  3. One of them works harder and gets ahead, while the other relaxes and is left behind in the acceleration.

The Burnout Generation

Millennials are fast becoming the burnout generation, due to them treating free time as not leisure time, when they can relax and unwind, but as bonus time for them to work harder and up their game.

The hyperproductive, work-obsessed world is hell-bent to automate every to-do list item so that you can work more and create more to-do lists.

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Why We Think Some Chores Are Stressful

Why We Think Some Chores Are Stressful

Any chore becomes a humongous, stressful task if the right motivation is not behind it. Something that you don’t want to do, but still have to, makes it an undesirable activity.

Being Intentional In Your Daily Activities

  • When the task is guided and motivated by a pure intention, the inevitable obstacles become interesting challenges, like a video game that you want to play and win.
  • Performing a task with a wholehearted intention makes all the difference and turns your work into a delightful activity that you look forward to.
  • The distinction of trying vs intending is a litmus test for all the struggles and challenges that one faces in life.

When good habits break down

When good habits break down

It is easy to accumulate stuff, like unfiled papers and half-read books or unfinished projects. If left unattended, they can pile up and can spiral out of control. At some point, you can get fed up...

Clearing the mental desktop

There is a way to re-organize your unresolved thoughts and separate the important from the messy mental pile. In the quiet of the day, you sit down with a pencil and paper and ask yourself three questions.

  • What am I anxious about?
  • What am I upset about, and with whom?
  • What am I currently feeling excited or ambitious about?

Fragments provide clues

When you ask what you're anxious about, you may not have a clear answer. You may have fragments of responses that may not make much sense by itself. For example, "I am anxious about floorboards. Book mess."

Record these answers as they will give a hint about the main sore points in the back of your mind.