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How to Feel Better When You Don’t Know What’s Wrong

Feel-good activities

There are 2 types of feel-better activities:

  • Those that immediately improve your mood, but often at the expense of overall well-being. Easy to start doing, and often hard to stop, they tend not to have long-term rewards.
  • Those are activities that improve your well-being, and your mood too, but usually not right away. You never regret these activities and they take effort.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Feel Better When You Don’t Know What’s Wrong

How to Feel Better When You Don’t Know What’s Wrong

https://www.raptitude.com/2020/06/how-to-feel-better-when-you-dont-know-whats-wrong/

raptitude.com

3

Key Ideas

The Fragility of Ordinary Life

Our modern lives are only made stable by a surprisingly fragile configuration of routines. When one or more parts is broken, problems appear everywhere. And even the most bland adjustment could throw things off.

When You Don't Know What's Wrong

Solving a problem is very difficult when its cause is hard to trace. You can’t isolate the trouble the same way you would dunk a leaky inner tube into a bathtub to see where the bubbles come out, for example.

What you can do is try to focus on better inputs: i.e, if you're struggling because of the pandemic and its social and health consequences, try pouring more vegetables, books, and exercise into the front end of the system, while reducing the intake of sugar, Netflix, and news.

Feel-good activities

There are 2 types of feel-better activities:

  • Those that immediately improve your mood, but often at the expense of overall well-being. Easy to start doing, and often hard to stop, they tend not to have long-term rewards.
  • Those are activities that improve your well-being, and your mood too, but usually not right away. You never regret these activities and they take effort.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Prisoner's Dilemma

The Prisoner's Dilemma

It is a famous thought experiment in Game Theory. Two prisoners in separate interrogation rooms have two options: to confess or to lie, and this can lead to three outcomes:

  1. If both c...

The Millennials Dilemma

The Prisoners Dilemma can be reimagined as a life-optimization matrix. When two people have some free time due to a time-saving technique, they can spend it either on leisure or further work. This can have three outcomes:

  1. Both individuals choose to work harder in their free time, remaining in a constant state of acceleration
  2. Both individuals choose to relax and chill out.
  3. One of them works harder and gets ahead, while the other relaxes and is left behind in the acceleration.

The Burnout Generation

Millennials are fast becoming the burnout generation, due to them treating free time as not leisure time, when they can relax and unwind, but as bonus time for them to work harder and up their game.

The hyperproductive, work-obsessed world is hell-bent to automate every to-do list item so that you can work more and create more to-do lists.

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Picking up what you want to achieve

Picking up what you want to achieve

The first component to achieving something is picking it.

It has to be something tangible, but that is currently not tangible to you: it has to be something you currently d...

Common backup learning styles

  • Imagining: coming up with ideas.
  • Reflecting: learning about the ideas you come up with.
  • Analyzing: synthesizing the ideas you’re learning and making strategic plans about how to use them.
  • Deciding: choosing a specific way to go with a specific idea.
  • Acting: taking action toward the attainment of your idea
  • Experiencing: learning from multiple angles.

Learning and mindsets

  • Most of us have a growth mindset about the learning style that come easy to us. For example, if you like math, you probably believe you can get better at math and you approach challenges and failures in your learning process as opportunities to grow.
  • Also, most of us have a fixed mindset about the learning styles we struggle with. For example, if you don’t like writing, you probably believe you can’t get better at it.

2 more ideas

Weak Words Used Often

Every word you use while working expresses something about your personal brand, your confidence, state of mind, authority and knowledge. The verbs that we put in sentences are key to our ima...

'Think'

We use "I think: often while at work, but it's a dysfunctional addition to a start of a sentence, that while ok to use occasionally in trivial situations, is to be avoided in meetings or one-on-ones. 

Try replacing it with "I'm confident".

'Need'

When we use "I need" at the start of a sentence it sounds like pleading rather than empowered. It makes us sound needy.

Swap "I need" with "Please" to sound polite and confident.

4 more ideas