How To Navigate The Tricky Waters Of A Career Change - Deepstash

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How To Navigate The Tricky Waters Of A Career Change

https://www.fastcompany.com/3026011/how-to-navigate-the-tricky-waters-of-a-career-change

fastcompany.com

How To Navigate The Tricky Waters Of A Career Change
Do you step into the office some mornings and wonder how you got there or what your life would look like if you had taken a different turn or studied a different field? Karen Elizaga, a New York-based executive coach and author of Find Your Sweet Spot, knows what it's like to be trapped in a career that isn't working for you.

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How to tell if you’re in the wrong career

Ask yourself these three questions:

  • Is your paycheck the only thing fueling your workday?
  • Are you a chronic complainer?
  • Do you have poor performance reviews? 

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How to change careers

How to change careers
  • Do an assessment. Make a list of your strengths, weaknesses, what you like and hate to do. Look outside and ask what industry lines up with the things you wrote under strengths and likes.
  • Avoid dwelling on the past. Take what you’ve learned and move it to an industry that’s going to suit you better.
  • Jumping ship isn’t always the answer. Walking away from an unfulfilling career isn’t always an option, especially for those who can’t afford the financial consequences of making a switch.
  • Don’t react too quickly. Know the kind of person you are and the kind of job you would enjoy before you can look out at the universe of jobs that are out there and make the move.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Changing careers

You and you alone are responsible for creating your own future. 

Time to give serious thought to this life-shaping question: What exactly are you going to do with the rest of your li...

Start with honest self-assessment

  • Analyze your current skill set, training level, and accomplishments to date. 
  • Write down the aspects of the work you liked and what tasks or things you disliked
  • Explore different career options. Investigate new fields, industries and potential careers. 
  • Interview individuals who work at those types of jobs, or in fields of interest to you. 
  • Look at growth opportunities, salaries, benefits, education level and then determine the job title to target.

Change from careers

  • Use your transferable skills. You have acquired abilities from previous positions.
  • Use your strengths. Incorporate your talents into any position you choose to go after.
  • Get new skills. Study the industry you want to enter. Take some courses so you can more quickly enter the field.
  • Many people prevent their own success. They find excuses, or blame others, for their own failures or mistakes instead of learning and improving from them.

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Conduct the Effective Job Interview

  • Prepare your questions based on the attributes of an ideal candidate,
  • Reduce stress level. Tell the candidates in advance the questions you plan to ask.
  • Involve enoug...

Starting with you

Focus on you first as the foundation. Your beliefs, attitude, and energy will determine your success. Spend time building up your confidence. 

  • Jot down your compet...

Thinking like a historian

Your resume is a marketing document, not an autobiography that details every past role and responsibility. Your objective it trying to prompt a purchase decision, which is to invite you in for an interview.

Delve into job boards and companies' careers pages. Pull a few postings, and find what theme or criteria keep coming up. For instance, if you continually find that they need someone who can solve complex problems and navigate ambiguity, and you can do that, then put it in your resume.

Looking at the big picture

Remember all of the skills you bring to the table. If you're applying for a project management role, consider highlighting the complementary skills you bring to the table. However, it should be a value add, not a random sidebar of your career.

Showing how your specific background allows you to bring a new perspective to your work will help you to stand out above other candidates.