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To Change Reality, Stop Denying It - Nat Eliason

https://www.nateliason.com/blog/change-reality

nateliason.com

To Change Reality, Stop Denying It - Nat Eliason
Over two-thirds of adults in the US are overweight or obese. There is a host of factors contributing to this, but one reason it doesn't change is that many people who are overweight are denying part of the reality of their situation. The first way they might deny reality is by thinking they're not overweight.

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Ray Dalio

"People who confuse what they wish were true with what is really true create distorted pictures of reality that make it impossible for them to make the best choices.”

Ray Dalio

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To change reality, stop denying it

To change reality, stop denying it
Solving problems has to start with getting an accurate picture of reality and then deciding what to do about it

Forming opinions before trying to get all of the facts straight leads to bad decisions, poor choices, and further frustration down the line. In many cases, it exacerbates the problem.

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Dealing with the truth

  • When you have a choice between telling the truth or protecting someone’s feelings, it’s better to go with the truth, in a respectful way.
  • Default to blaming yourself and what you control rather than looking for outside excuses. 
  • Check the sources of your beliefs. Ask yourself how you know what you’re saying. Did you research it? Or are you repeating a belief of the box you’re in? 
  • Choose truth over comfort. If an idea or some research offends you, that doesn’t mean it’s wrong. 

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