13 Secrets to Performing Well Under Pressure - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

13 Secrets to Performing Well Under Pressure

https://www.inc.com/business-insider/13-secrets-to-performing-well-under-pressure.html

inc.com

13 Secrets to Performing Well Under Pressure
Let's get this out of the way right now: Nobody performs well under pressure. A lot of us think we do, but we don't, or, at least, we don't perform as well as we could perform. We may feel more creative when we're under the gun, but it's a feeling, not a reality.

12

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

High-pressure moments as a (fun) challenge

High-pressure moments as a (fun) challenge

Most people see "pressure situations" as threatening, and that makes them perform even less well. 

But, "when you see the pressure as a challenge, you are stimulated to give the attention and energy needed to make your best effort." 

To practice, build "challenge thinking" into your daily life.

576 SAVES

990 READS

VIEW

One of many opportunities

Is this high-pressure situation a good opportunity? Sure. Is it the only opportunity you will ever have for the rest of your life? Probably not.

Before an interview or a big meeting, give yourself a pep talk: "I will have other interviews" (or presentations or sales calls). 

406 SAVES

705 READS

Focus on the task

Focus on the task

Instead of worrying about the outcome, worry about the task at hand.

That means developing tunnel vision. When you keep your eye on the task at hand (and only the task at hand), all you can see is the concrete steps necessary to excel.

464 SAVES

725 READS

Plan for the worst

"What-if" scenarios can be your friend. By letting yourself play out the worst-case outcomes, you're able to brace yourself for them.

The key here is that you're anticipating the unexpected. Instead of panicking, you'll be able to (better) "maintain your composure and continue your task to the best of your ability."

413 SAVES

600 READS

Take control

In a pressure moment, there are factors you have control over and factors you don't. 

Focus on the factors you can control, not on the "uncontrollables," that could intensify the pressure, increase your anxiety, and ultimately undermine your confidence.

401 SAVES

612 READS

Remember your past success

Remembering your past success ignites confidenceYou did it before, and you can do it again.

Once you're feeling good about yourself, you'll be better able to cut through anxiety and take care of business.

407 SAVES

581 READS

Be positive

Belief in a successful outcome can prevent you from worry that can drain and distract your working memory.

Anxiety and fear are stripped from the equation, allowing you to act with confidence.

352 SAVES

533 READS

Get in touch with your senses

When you're under a deadline and the world feels like it's crashing in, you're particularly prone to making careless errors.

To depressurize the situation, focus on the here and now. Tune into your senses. What do you see? What do you hear? How's your breathing?

380 SAVES

514 READS

Listen to music

By listening to music, you're able to literally distract yourself from your anxiety.

342 SAVES

496 READS

Create a pre-performance routine

The idea here is to create a (brief) routine that you go through in the minutes before you present or perform, Weisinger and Pawliw-Fry suggest.

A "pre-routine" prevents you from becoming distracted, keeps you focused, and puts you in the "zone" by signaling to your body it's time to perform.

357 SAVES

470 READS

Slow down

When you're in a high-pressure situation, it's natural to speed up your thinking. It can lead you to act before you're ready. 

Slow down. Give yourself a second to breathe and formulate a plan. You'll think more flexibly, creatively, attentively, and your work will be all the better for it. 

365 SAVES

475 READS

Share the pressure

Telling someone else about the pressure you're feeling has been proven to reduce anxiety and stress.

Sharing your feelings allows you to examine them, challenge their reality, and view a pressure situation in a realistic manner.

341 SAVES

515 READS

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Learn to be ok with discomfort

If you know you have a high-stakes event coming up, become familiar with feeling pressure and learn to work through it. 

For example: If you need to give a presentation to cowo...

Establish a pre-performance routine

Whether it’s taking a few deep breaths, doing some light stretching, or having a quick phone call with someone you trust, spending your last few minutes doing something active before a big event will prevent you from spiraling into worry, so you can perform confidently.

Shift your attention away from worries

... and to the task at hand. 

Mindfulness can help you regain a sense of calm and focus your attention, so you can avoid being caught off guard by your anxiety. You can see it for what it is, and choose to direct your attention elsewhere. 

Resilience

... is the ability to adapt to adversity or significant stress.

When faced with difficulty, resilient people recover more quickly. They view setbacks as temporary, move forward despit...

Optimistic explanatory style

The ability to perceive setbacks as temporary and solvable.

Instead of viewing stress as a sign of failure or as a threat, you can choose to look for the challenge within it or the lesson to be learned.

Finding meaning within chaos is a core component of resilient leadership.

Self-awareness and resilience

Resilient people take the time to understand what they’re feeling, even if it’s uncomfortable.

To manage your emotions effectively, you must learn to express yourself clearly, assertively, and with empathy for others.

3 more ideas

Shallow breathing

We loose the ability to breath deeply naturally as we age: deep breathing comes naturally to children, but we lose the ability because we’re in a constant state of fight-or-flight, low-level str...

Controlled breathing

... is the fastest, most effective way to trigger the relaxation response, enabling you to think more clearly and perform better under pressure.

Navy Seal tricks

The Navy SEALs use 2 breathing techniques that force the body into a more relaxed state when they’re in a high-pressure situation:

  • Tactical breathing
  • Box breathing.