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What if We Could Live for a Million Years?

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-if-we-could-live-for-a-million-years/

scientificamerican.com

What if We Could Live for a Million Years?
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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The Risks Of A Life Spanning Centuries

The Risks Of A Life Spanning Centuries

With the rapid advancement in bioscience and technology, it is likely that most ailments will be cured in the future and our life span would increase considerably.

With increased lifespans, there are new challenges that would need to be overcome. One could plan ahead and accomplish tasks that would take decades or centuries, unlike our current mindset of relatively short-term goals. An extended period of existence would make us wiser and afraid of taking risks.

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The Challenges of The Future

As the human life span increases to span centuries, the planetary environment, along with the collaboration and cooperation among nations would come to the forefront, as hostile people and chronic pollution are extremely dangerous in the long run.

While our survival would still not be a guarantee, there will be a new challenge of overpopulation, which could be moderated by sending people into space to colonize other places, and by limiting the birth rate.

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The Long Journey

As inter-galaxy travel becomes a reality, there could be many spaceships which would be able to take us to nearby habitable solar systems, setting up for new adventures, challenges and a completely radical lifestyle.

The changes in Earth’s biosphere could also be a concern, as new technologies and constant harvesting of resources (like deforestation) can lead to dangerous environmental changes.

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The Future On Earth: The Long-Term Perspective

When we look at the problems we may face if we live a million years, we start to realize that the current problems and concerns are nothing when compared to the long-term perspective of our planet and the universe which we inhabit.

The constant injury humans cause to our home planet would seem childish and stupid, when seen alongside the larger picture of where we are in the universe.

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The NDE phenomenon

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About Consciousness

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Searching For Physical Footprints

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Neuronal Correlates of Consciousness (NCC)

The whole brain can be considered an NCC because it generates experience continually.

  • When parts of the cerebellum, the "little brain" underneath the back of the brain, are lost to a stroke or otherwise, patients may lose the ability to play the piano, for example.  But they never lose any aspect of their consciousness. This is because the cerebellum is almost wholly a feed-forward circuit. There are no complex feedback loops.
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The natural preferences of our brain

The natural preferences of our brain

In a perfect world, we would use both success and failure as instructive lessons. But our brain doesn't learn that way. It learns more from some experiences than others.

Confirm...

Choice influences our decision-making

A study found that choice had an apparent influence on decision-making. In the studies subjects learned more when they had a free choice and when the choice gave a higher reward.

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Choice-confirmation bias

When people can make a free choice, they embrace positive or negative outcomes that confirm they were right.

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