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Smartphones Are Toys First, Tools Second

https://www.raptitude.com/2019/05/smartphones-are-toys-first-tools-second/

raptitude.com

Smartphones Are Toys First, Tools Second
If you time-traveled to the 1960s, or even the 1980s, and tried to describe smartphones to the people you met, they wouldn't believe you.

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An amazing piece of Technology

An amazing piece of Technology
  • If you time-traveled to the 1960s, or the 1980s, and tried to describe smartphones to the people you met, they wouldn’t believe you.
  • It is an all-in-one piece of tech that lets you do practically anything.
  • To people from previous generations, these would appear as Superpowers.
  • Yet in the current age, a section of people are despising smartphones and want to get rid of them.

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Smartphones are now toys

Smartphones are now toys

Our phones' utilitarian function has is compromised by the presence of numerous magnetic recreational functions.

We don’t play with our keys or debit cards, tape measures, calculators or dictionaries, but we do play with our smartphones because they are now 90% toy.

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Make Smartphones tools again

Make Smartphones tools again
For a Smartphone to be a tool, it has to useful and boring. It can be attractive for intentional, practical uses, but not for a reflexive diversion—a Swiss Army knife, not a carnival, in our pockets.

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Going all-in on remote work: benefits for businesses

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