Lethologica: what happens when a word is on the tip of the tongue - Deepstash

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Lethologica: what happens when a word is on the tip of the tongue

https://nesslabs.com/lethologica-tip-of-the-tongue

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Lethologica: what happens when a word is on the tip of the tongue

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Tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon

Tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon

The tip-of-the-tongue, or lethologica, is a common phenomenon where memories seem to be momentarily inaccessible.

Bilingual people seem to experience more tip-of-the-tongue moments in their less dominant language. If you find yourself repeatedly struggling to recall a specific word, your memory may not be adequately stored.

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How to manage the tip-of-the-tongue state

Next time you experience a tip-of-the-tongue state, don't retrieve the information from memory. Instead, look up the correct answer. Repeat it a few times or write it down to help with encoding.

People that experience the tip-of-the-tongue state often suffer from incorrect practice time. Instead of learning the correct work, they are learning the mistake itself. For example, some music students who claim to practice diligently can get worse over time. This is because they keep on repeating the same mistakes, instead of using deliberate practice. They actually train themselves to make mistakes.

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The benefits of our faulty memory

The limits of our memory serve us well in many respects.

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