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Are you guilty of tsundoku or bibliomania?

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-44981013

bbc.com

Are you guilty of tsundoku or bibliomania?
Do you have a habit of picking up books that you never quite get around to reading? If this sounds like you, you might be unwittingly engaging in tsundoku - a Japanese term used to describe a person who owns a lot of unread literature.

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Tsundoku

Tsundoku

In the Japanese language, there is a term to design the behavior of a person who buys books only to leave them unread on a shelf at home. This term is ‘tsundoku’ and it implies the combination of the verbs ‘to read’ and ‘to pile up’. Hence, the meaning ‘of buying reading material only to have it piled up’. However, the word itself bears no offense to the people who associate themselves with it.

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Bibliomania

... or the collection addiction, was first spotted in Thomas Frognall Dibdin’s novels and it describes the unstoppable act of collecting first editions and illustrated copies of literature

Later on, the same term would describe a person who is more passionate about rather than obsessed with building up a collection of literature.

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Tsundoku vs. Bibliomania 

Though both terms are used in order to describe behaviours related to readers, Tsundoku implies the idea of having as goal to read books rather than to simply collect them, while Bibliomania refers to the will to collect books, rather than to read them.

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Tsundoku nowadays

Initially, the term was used only to describe the behavior of a person who is rather passionate about the idea of buying books only to leave them unread on a shelf at home. 

However, over time, individuals have come to use the word in order to explain their behavior in regards to films, television shows, clothing or video games. Therefore, nowadays the term can be used to portray someone who is keen on making a collection of any kind.

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