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Why Impatience is a Virtue

https://benjaminspall.com/impatience/

benjaminspall.com

Why Impatience is a Virtue
Recognize that impatience is a virtue, and that reframing impatience as a positive character trait will help us get to where we want to be in life.

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What Impatience Is

What Impatience Is

Impatience is defined as a form of hurry: you are unable to sit tight and wait your turn.

Impatience is generally seen as a negative force, but people who are considered driven, gritty, or otherwise motivated to achieve their goals often share an impatient streak.

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What Makes Us Impatient

  • Impatience is generated by an innate need to not simply wait around for life to happen to you.
  • Without impatience you feel that you will never get anything done (at least not at the pace that you expect of yourself).

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Reframing Impatience As A Positive Trait

  • Impatient people are usually motivated people, and motivated people tend to know how to prioritize.
  • Impatient people take their energy and motivation to be where they want to be and give it everything they’ve got.
  • Impatient people persist in the sign of obstacles and other setbacks; all they care about is results.

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But every now and then, a moment of awe challenges our understanding of the world...

Defining Awe

Awe is an emotional response to being in the presence of something greater than yourself, and that exceeds current knowledge structures.

Awe is a positive emotion and has a broadening effect on our thoughts and actions.

Awe-inducing stimuli

Feelings of awe have historically been recorded when individuals encounter contact with a "higher" power.

In modern times, the main triggers of awe are philosophical ones such as literature, music, paintings, and nature. Examples include natural wonders or events such as childbirth.

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The Slowness Rage

The Slowness Rage

Being passively angry while walking due to others being slower than you is a thing. It is called ‘Pedestrian Aggressiveness Syndrome’ and has many degrees of behaviour, each more violent than t...

Slow Life Is A Problem

Slow things are slowly driving us crazy. Society is now on a fast pace, and this has wrapped our sense of timing.

The accelerating pace of society has set off a cycle, resetting our internal timers. Rage for others who are slow eventually sabotages our timers. This is a downward spiral, where will power doesn’t work, and can even be detrimental.

Impatience: The New Virtue

Evolution has given us impatience. We are given the impulse to act, to choose, to abandon or to chase something else, in the limited time we have, instead of spending time in a single unrewarding or slow activity.

Taking into account the speed of communication that is now 10 million times faster than before, and human movement, which is now 100 times faster, we can see society picking up speed and becoming increasingly impatient.

Cultivating Patience

Patience decreases negative emotions and conditions like anxiety and depression. It also increases empathy, generosity and compassion.

Patience as a personality trait can be cultivated and ...

Patience: Three Expressions

  1. Interpersonal: Remaining calm when the other person is upset or being a jerk.
  2. Handling Hardships: Being able to see the positive in a serious setback.
  3. Daily Annoyances: Not be irritated by the daily hassles and delays.

Identify Your Triggers

Most of us have heard of the ‘fight or flight’ response while we face a problem, obstacle or danger. Impatience is the ‘fight’ part of the same.

Our brains have a set of nervous tissue called the Amygdalae which is not nuanced enough to understand that all threats and dangers are not the same, not requiring the same (extreme) reaction. If one can bifurcate between true danger and less-serious threats, it is a good start to control your emotions.