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How unprocessed trauma is stored in the body

https://medium.com/@biobeats/how-unprocessed-trauma-is-stored-in-the-body-10222a76cbad

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How unprocessed trauma is stored in the body
When all is well, our brain is the greatest supercomputer on earth. A complex network of about 100 billion neurons, it's not only great at processing and organising information - it's really, really fast. Every second, somewhere between 18 and 640 trillion electric pulses are zipping through your brain.

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Untreated trauma and its negative effects

All individual who has ever dealt with trauma knows that healing can take a lot of time if it eventually happens. Untreated trauma seems to leave scars on our brain, altering the way we perceive new experiences. Furthermore, having dealt with trauma makes us more prone to serious health conditions.

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Trauma changes our brain

After having experienced trauma, our brain can not function properly anymore, at least for a while. 

Among the negative effects that trauma leads to there is the risk of developing physical illnesses or the so-called Post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Post-traumatic stress disorder

When dealing with PTSD, the three parts of our brain, which are responsible for processing stress, suffer changes: the hippocampus, the amygdala function and the prefrontal/ anterior cingulate function.

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Overcoming trauma

Trauma leaves marks on both our body and our brain. However, these scars do not have to last forever.

In order to heal from a traumatic experience, one can try therapy, meditation and physical activity. All of these work wonders and result in an almost full recovery of the individual.

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The different kinds of memories

The different kinds of memories

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How we experience memories

Memories are held within groups of neurons called cell assemblies. They fire as a group in response to a specific stimulus, such as recognising your friend's face.

The more neurons fire together, the more the interconnection of the cells strengthen. We experience the nerves' collective activity as a memory.

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