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The Four Tools of Discipline

https://fs.blog/2016/06/the-four-tools-of-discipline/#

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The Four Tools of Discipline
Life is full of problems. We can moan about them or we can solve them. Scott Peck argues in The Road Less Traveled: A New Psychology of Love, Traditional Values and Spiritual Growth that discipline is the toolbox for solving problems. Peck's argument is based on the notion that most of us want to avoid problems - they are painful and often lead us to confront our humanity.

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The 4 Tools of Discipline

  • Delayed Gratification: Scheduling the pain and pleasure of life in such a way as to enhance the pleasure by meeting and experiencing the pain first.
  • Accepting Responsibility: I can solve a problem only when I say “This is my problem and it’s up to me to solve it"
  • Dedication to Reality: The only way we can ensure our map of the world is correct and accurate is to expose it to the criticism of others.
  • Balancing: The capacity not only to express our anger but also not to express it. Moreover, we must possess the capacity to express our anger in different ways. 

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