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4 Tips to Help You Make Better, More Ethical Decisions

https://bigthink.com/design-for-good/4-tips-to-help-you-make-better-more-ethical-decisions#

bigthink.com

4 Tips to Help You Make Better, More Ethical Decisions
A few weeks ago we talked to , Director of the Hoffberger Center for Professional Ethics and associate professor at the University of Baltimore, who told us about his goal to create a Philosophy Camp for adults and why such an initiative is important.

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The ABCD Guide to Ethical Decision-Making

A series of questions we can use to examine ethical issues we are faced with, centered around 4 dimensions:

  • Awareness
  • Beliefs
  • Consequences
  • Decision

It can take us out of the trap of just assuming we’re good people, without truly delivering on that assumption. 

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A. Awareness of ethical issues

A. Awareness of ethical issues
Assess if you are aware of the ethical issue you’re a part of, with questions like:
  • Do we know all the facts?
  • Is this an ethical problem or a legal one? Or both?
  • Can it be resolved simply by calling upon the law or referring to an organizational policy?
  • Am I aware of the people involved in this case and who may be affected by my decision and action?

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B. Beliefs around ethical issues

B. Beliefs around ethical issues
Establish your moral beliefs, principles, values and virtues, or lack thereof, with questions like:
  • What kind of person am I? Would I want this done to me or to those I love?
  • Would it be responsible of me if I thought everyone should act this way in my situation?
  • Am I setting a good example or a bad example?
  • Can I continue to respect myself given the probable outcomes of my action? 

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C. Consequences of ethical issues

C. Consequences of ethical issues
Use moral imagination to think about consequences for yourself and others, not only now but into the future as well:
  • Who may be affected by my decision?
  • How may my decisions/actions affect other and myself?

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D. Decisions related to ethical issues

D. Decisions related to ethical issues

Decide what is the best thing to do when faced with moral issues, considering questions like:

  • Would I mind my action being broadcast on the six o’clock news?
  • Could I justify my actions to my family and close friends?
  • What advice would I give to a close friend who had the same decision to make as I do? 

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Personal Or Core Values

They are what you consider most important in your life, literally what you “value. ” They are broad concepts that can be applied across a wide range of circumstances, as opposed to narrow answers t...

The Benefits Of Having a Core Value

  • Having a core values list helps you make better decisions. The decisions you make come more quickly and efficiently than they would without it.
  • Being unconscious of your core values makes you likely to keep repeating the same mistakes.

Creating a List Of Personal Values

The core values that are most valuable to each of us come from our own personal experience, not from being taught.

As you put them into practice you’ll get better at internalizing these values and they’ll express themselves subconsciously with smaller decisions, as well.

Nihilism

Nihilism means "nothing." It is the lack of belief in meaning or substance in an area of philosophy.

  • Moral nihilism argues that moral facts cannot exist.
  • Metaphysical nihilism ar...

Existentialism

Existentialism originates from Soren Kierkegaard and Nietzche. It focuses on the problems produced by existential nihilism. For instance:

  • What is the point of living if life has no inherent purpose? 
  • How do we face the knowledge of our inevitable demise?

Existentialism emphasizes individual existence, freedom and choice.

Stoicism

Stoicism was popular in ancient Greece and Rome and is practiced by many in high-stress environments.

Stoicism focuses on how to live in a world where things don't go as planned. The idea is to accept all the things beyond your control and to focus on what you can control.

Thomas Hobbes explained

Hobbes, an English philosopher, believes mankind's nature to be solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short as described in his book, The Leviathan.

This is why people adhere to social c...

Moral issues

The 'Show, don't tell' rule is especially pertinent when it comes to immoral acts.

Until a book becomes moving pictures, any moral issue with it doesn't seem to reach national press levels, because it shows these contentious issues to a wider audience.  If you show the act, but don't tell anyone what to think about it, the fact that an author or film-maker hasn't clanged down a big sign saying 'And this is bad' is tantamount to advocation. 

GoT's similarities with the Leviathan

A Song of Ice and Fire might very well deliberately echo Leviathan. The notion that, without protection from the Iron Throne, the land falls into an every-man-for-himself struggle does echo the ideas laid down in Leviathan.