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Use The Medium Method to Combine Digital Note-Taking With Pen and Paper

https://lifehacker.com/use-the-medium-method-to-combine-digital-note-taking-wi-1779714829#

lifehacker.com

Use The Medium Method to Combine Digital Note-Taking With Pen and Paper
As much as we enjoy digital tools, there's something to be said for the simplicity of good, old-fashioned pen and paper. Instead of picking one or the other for your note-taking and day-to-day tasks, get the best of both worlds with The Medium Method.

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The Medium Method

Combining paper and digital tools for personal organization and productivity. You need:

  • The main notebook, the backbone of the entire methond. You capture everything here: quick ideas, tasks, sketches.
  • A “traveling” notebook: Jot down quick notes, then transfer those notes to your main notebook later.
  • A digital task list/calendar: At the end of the day, go through your main notebook and add any tasks or events.
  • Long-term digital storage: to digitize the most important items from your main notebook.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Pen And Paper

The Pen And Paper

Even in this digital age, when automation is in full force and being swift on the keyboard is a crucial skill, using your hand and pencil is still on top of the charts for cognitive learnin...

Taking Notes By Hand: Better Brain Processing

  • Keyboarding information verbatim into the laptop does not involve any cognitive engagement like concept and vocabulary mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing or organizing as manual, by-hand note taking does.
  • When we use a pen and paper, we are creating notes in the real sense, crafting and designing them by hand, which aids brain processing.
  • The cognitive demands of note-taking, taking into consideration speed and legibility makes the process slightly challenging, and creates stronger memory.

Pictorial Learnings

Handwritten notes, letters, diaries and journals are an artful, reflective activity that aids learning, while becoming enduring over time.

Doodling and drawing illustrations also help us describe our learnings to others, strengthening and aiding visual learning in us as well as those who we teach.

The Outline/List

Is a linear method of taking notes that proceeds down the page, using indentation or bullets to denote major and minor points.

Pros: it records content relationship in a way tha...

The Sentence Method

The goal is to jot down your thoughts as quickly as possible. Format is kept to a minimum: every new thought is written on a new line. 

Pros: Is like free writing for notes.

Cons: lack organization and notes can be hard to understand.

Works for: meetings or lectures that lack organization; when information is presented very quickly.

SQ3R (Survey, Question, Read, Recite, Review)

  • Skim the material for bolded text, images, summaries, to produce a list of headlines;
  • Each headline is then written in the form of a question;
  • Record your “answers” to the reading questions under each corresponding header;
  • Once you’ve finished reading the text, write a summary of the material from memory—this is the “recite” part of the process. 
  • Finally, review your notes to make sure you’ve completely grasped the concepts.

Works for: dense written material.

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Purpose of taking notes

Note-taking serves one simple purpose: to help you remember information. 

Although we might associate note-taking with school, it's something most of us continue doing for the bul...

Keep your notes simple

Keep them short, but have enough triggers in the keywords to jumpstart your memory when you look at them again:

  • Stick to keywords and very short sentences.
  • Write out your notes in your own words.
  • Find a note-taking style to fit both your needs and the speakers.
  • Write down what matters.

Outdated techniques

Rereading your notes, highlighting them, underlining them, and even summarizing them  - all take a lot of your time.

Better methods include taking breaks and spreading out your studying (known as distributed practice), and taking practice tests (which isn't really applicable outside of school).