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The benefits of note-taking by hand

https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20200910-the-benefits-of-note-taking-by-hand

bbc.com

The benefits of note-taking by hand
Computers and phones have become the go-to note-taking method for many. But your brain benefits from an old-fashioned pen and paper.

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The Pen And Paper

The Pen And Paper

Even in this digital age, when automation is in full force and being swift on the keyboard is a crucial skill, using your hand and pencil is still on top of the charts for cognitive learning.

Every student of all age groups has one cognitive toolkit with them: a pen and a notebook, to be able to take notes by hand. Handwritten notes are an important and powerful practice to infuse information in the brain, making it easier to retrieve information when required.

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Taking Notes By Hand: Better Brain Processing

  • Keyboarding information verbatim into the laptop does not involve any cognitive engagement like concept and vocabulary mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing or organizing as manual, by-hand note taking does.
  • When we use a pen and paper, we are creating notes in the real sense, crafting and designing them by hand, which aids brain processing.
  • The cognitive demands of note-taking, taking into consideration speed and legibility makes the process slightly challenging, and creates stronger memory.

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Pictorial Learnings

Handwritten notes, letters, diaries and journals are an artful, reflective activity that aids learning, while becoming enduring over time.

Doodling and drawing illustrations also help us describe our learnings to others, strengthening and aiding visual learning in us as well as those who we teach.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Medium Method

Combining paper and digital tools for personal organization and productivity. You need:

  • The main notebook, the backbone of the entire methond. You capture everything h...

The Outline method

The Outline method

It requires you to structure your notes in form of an outline by using bullet points to represent different topics and their subtopics. 

Start writing main topics on the far left ...

The Cornell Method

  • The page is divided into 3 or 4 sections (top for title and, bottom for summary, 2 columns in the center).  
  • 30% of width should be kept in the left column while the remaining 70% for the right column.
  • All notes go into the main note-taking column
  • The smaller column on the left side is for comments, questions or hints about the actual notes. 

The Boxing Method

All notes that are related to each other are grouped together in a box. 

A dedicated box is assigned for each section of notes which cuts down the time needed for reading and reviewing.

Apps are especially helpful for this method because content on the page can be reordered or resized subsequently.

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The Art of Note-Taking

The Art of Note-Taking

Even in an age where laptops rule, notetaking is still the tool of choice for highly successful students, entrepreneurs, and leaders.

Tim Ferris attributes his notetaking style as one o...

The Cornell Method

This simple and highly systematic note-taking method helps you to understand key ideas and relationships easily. Best used for:

  • Gathering information from a seminar or presentation.
  • Recording college lecture notes.
  • Studying literature or a textbook.

Cornell Method: How to take notes

  1. Write down the lecture name/seminar/reading topic at the top of the page.
  2. Write down notes in the largest section of the page (right-hand column). Transcribe only the facts using bulleted lists and abbreviations. Take notes of questions that arise.
    3. Create question cues in the left-hand column that you will use later as a study tool.
  3. At the bottom section of the page, summarize the main ideas of your notes. Ask yourself how you would explain this information to someone else. Keep it concise.

Read over your notes in the left-hand column and summary at the bottom as often as possible. Quiz yourself with the questions you've included in the left column. Repeat often to increase your recall and deepen your comprehension.