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Why do we feel schadenfreude - and who it feels it the most?

https://bigthink.com/mind-brain/psychology-of-schadenfreude#

bigthink.com

Why do we feel schadenfreude - and who it feels it the most?
Anybody would admit that they like it when an opposing sports team makes a critical mistake. Many of us also like it when a rival coworker gets turned down for a promotion that we were hoping to get ourselves. Some people think it's funny when others trip.

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Schadenfreude

It's the experience of feeling of joy in other's harm, the  pleasure of witnessing the troubles, failures, or humiliation of another.

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The 3 forms of schadenfreude

  • Aggression-based schadenfreude: when members of a group experience schadenfreude at the misfortunes of those outside their group;
  • Rivalry-based schadenfreude: driven b...

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