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This Is Why You Grieve The Ending Of Your Favorite TV Show

TV series as a form of detachment

For many people, watching a show regularly can be a form of temporarily checking out of what’s going on in the real world.

It’s a way we detach from our own issues, our own problems. And the thought of giving that up and coming back to our own world is a little frightening for people.

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This Is Why You Grieve The Ending Of Your Favorite TV Show

This Is Why You Grieve The Ending Of Your Favorite TV Show

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/grief-end-of-show-game-of-thrones_l_5cdae9c1e4b0f7ba48abbd14

huffpost.com

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Key Ideas

Grieving the ending of a series

There are varying degrees of grief (the end of a movie or show is obviously not the same as the death of a person), but many people do experience feelings of loss around different forms of media, such as the ending of a favorite show.

Connecting to stories and characters

We are genuinely invested in the outcome of a story and the state of the various characters.

These connections to fictional stories and characters are why many people share their opinions about the plots and characters’ actions. People feel so connected, and in some cases, they feel like they have ownership over something.

A form to look back at life

The length of the series is a way of looking back on our life: It reminds us of the passage of time and where we were and who we watched it with.

A collective experience

The actual experience of watching a show ― whether it involves the same group of people, centers around a certain meal, or focuses on another viewing party tradition ― can also add to those feelings of loss once that series ends.

It becomes a ritual for people. And it's a form of shared collective experience.

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