6 Life Lessons From Video Games

6 Life Lessons From Video Games
  1. Sometimes games tempt us to cheat, but winning while cheating is an empty victory.
  2. Many games have secret bonuses and features not explained. To extract the most out of things you have to be meticulous.
  3. Repeated failure is built into the learning curve of any well-designed game. Failure is a part of success in real life and you have to learn to embrace it.
  4.  Experiment with strategies, even if it leads to an occasional loss.
  5. Most gamers are willing to spend copious amounts of time mastering games but can’t say the same about their careers. Enthusiasm propels you to success, try to bring some of that to life.
  6. Most people are engaged by games but not by their jobs. Try to gamefy your work and challenge yourself at the office.
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Video Games Can Teach You Personal Accountability

The reward our brains feel when accomplishing something in a game teaches us to focus our own actions and helps us control the situations around us. Lessons like this are easily applied in the real world.

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Sympathy and Empathy

Video games had a reputation of being emotionally numbing and brain rotting, but this recent trend towards narrative-centric gaming is now developing a player’s sense of sympathy and empathy.

Game designers are now starting to explore and incorporate the emotional elements that exist in other forms of media, the most important element being narrative. 

A new disorder

The World Health Organization officially added a new disorder to the section on substance use and addictive behaviors : gaming disorder

A gaming disorder is defined as an overly and uncontainable preoccupation with video games — the obsession results in significant personal, social, academic or occupational impairment for at least 12 months.

However,  the idea that someone can be addicted to a behavior, as opposed to a substance, remains contentious.

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