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5 Productivity Myths Debunked by Science - Art Of Productivity

Myth #4: Pushing To Get Things Done

Myth #4: Pushing To Get Things Done

Willpower is a limited resource, one that we deplete through hard, focused work. We need to take regular breaks to restore our flagging willpower and keep our productivity in the long run.

Take a break and do something different for a few minutes every half-hour or so to give your brain a break and replenish your mental resources. 

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5 Productivity Myths Debunked by Science - Art Of Productivity

5 Productivity Myths Debunked by Science - Art Of Productivity

http://artofproductivity.com/5-productivity-myths-debunked-by-science/

artofproductivity.com

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Key Ideas

Myth #5: You Should Never Work At Home

Some people working from home have a higher efficiency on time spent working and performance per minute. The employees surveyed also reported they were happier working at home. 

Myth #4: Pushing To Get Things Done

Willpower is a limited resource, one that we deplete through hard, focused work. We need to take regular breaks to restore our flagging willpower and keep our productivity in the long run.

Take a break and do something different for a few minutes every half-hour or so to give your brain a break and replenish your mental resources. 

Myth #3: The Internet Is A Distraction

The Internet distracts but we use it for researching items and retaining information. If you build up your searching skills and ignore distractions, like social networks, it becomes just a tool.

Myth #2: Early Birds Get The Worm

Creative insights may come during “non-optimal” times of the day. Society might be structured for early risers but you should stick to working during times when you’re at your most productive (as much as possible).

Myth #1: Multitasking Makes You Efficient

While multitasking your brain needs to do goal shifting and rule activation (turning off rules for one task and turning on rules for another).

Switching tasks always carries a cost in terms of time and mental energy. And although the cost in time is short we switch so often that it stacks up and can consume up to 40% of your time.

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When you overanalyze a situation, the repetitive thoughts, anxiety, and self-doubt decrease the amount of working memory you have available to complete challenging tasks, causing your productivity to plummet.

Overthinking kills your creativity

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