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5 Self-Sabotaging Behaviors You Should Avoid

Self-Sabotaging Behaviors

Self-Sabotaging Behaviors
  • Comparing Yourself to Others. Too much focus on others is bad for business and worse for self-confidence.
  • Failure to Take Risks and Consistently Challenge Yourself. The most successful people are always pushing limits and expanding boundaries.
  • Succumbing to Distractions. Eliminate distractions by giving yourself a specific deadline each day. After you’ve accomplished your goal, you can reward yourself with a Facebook or Twitter visit.
  • Inaction. Distraction and procrastination are like handcuffs that shackle your dreams.
  • An Unwillingness to Relinquish Past Mistakes. Learn from your flubs and challenge yourself to be better in the future. Then let that guilt go!

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5 Self-Sabotaging Behaviors You Should Avoid

5 Self-Sabotaging Behaviors You Should Avoid

https://www.success.com/5-self-sabotaging-behaviors-you-should-avoid/

success.com

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Key Idea

Self-Sabotaging Behaviors

  • Comparing Yourself to Others. Too much focus on others is bad for business and worse for self-confidence.
  • Failure to Take Risks and Consistently Challenge Yourself. The most successful people are always pushing limits and expanding boundaries.
  • Succumbing to Distractions. Eliminate distractions by giving yourself a specific deadline each day. After you’ve accomplished your goal, you can reward yourself with a Facebook or Twitter visit.
  • Inaction. Distraction and procrastination are like handcuffs that shackle your dreams.
  • An Unwillingness to Relinquish Past Mistakes. Learn from your flubs and challenge yourself to be better in the future. Then let that guilt go!

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