The Psychological Effects of Color - Deepstash
The Psychological Effects of Color

The Psychological Effects of Color

While most perceptions of color are subjective, some color effects have universal meaning. 

  • Colors in the red area of the color spectrum are known as warm colors and include red, orange, and yellow. These warm colors evoke emotions ranging from feelings of warmth and comfort to feelings of anger and hostility.
  • Colors on the blue side of the spectrum are known as cool colors and include blue, purple, and green. These colors are often described as calm, but can also call to mind feelings of sadness or indifference.

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MORE IDEAS FROM THEARTICLE

Color Usage In Chromotherapy
  • Red was used to stimulate the body and mind and to increase circulation.
  • Yellow was thought to stimulate the nerves and purify the body.
  • Orange was used to heal the lungs and to increase energy levels.
  • Blue was believed to soothe illnesses and treat pain.
  • Indigo shades were thought to alleviate skin problems.

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Color Preferences

Color preferences can sometimes make a statement about how we want other people to perceive us. Other factors such as age and gender can also influence the color choices we make.

The personality of the buyer can play an important role in color selection, but buyers are often heavily influenced by factors such as price and other practical concerns.

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  • The mood-altering effects of color may only be temporary.
  • Warm-colored placebo pills may be more effective than cool-colored placebo pills.
  • Installing blue-colored streetlights can lead to reduced crime in those areas.
  • Red causes people to react with greater speed and force, something that might prove useful during athletic activities.
  • Sports teams dressed in mostly black uniforms are more likely to receive penalties and that students were more likely to associate negative qualities with a player wearing a black uniform.
  • Seeing the color red before taking an exam may hurt test performance.
  • Certain colors have been associated with increased blood pressure, increased metabolism, and eyestrain.

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Modern Research on Color Psychology

Most psychologists view color therapy with skepticism and point out that the supposed effects of color are often grossly exaggerated. Also, one’s feelings about color are often deeply personal and rooted in their own experience or culture.

Much of the evidence in this emerging area is anecdotal at best, so more scientific research is needed to gain a better understanding of color psychology.

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Meanings Of Colors
  • White: can feel fresh and clean. Often used to evoke a sense of youth and modernity.
  • Black: often associated with sexy, powerful, mysterious, and even ominous feelings.
  • Silver: linked to a sense of innovation and modernity.
  • Red: a bold, attention-getting color that can transmit an image of power, action, and confidence.
  • Blue: linked to stability and safety.
  • Yellow: may mean that you are a happy person in general and perhaps a bit more willing than the average person to take risks.
  • Gray: may mean subtlety and that you don't want to stand out.

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"Colors, like features, follow the changes of the emotions."

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RELATED IDEAS

  • Professions that rely heavily on visual mediums use color psychology to try to predict and instigate emotions in their target audience.
  • People use colors and lighting to increase their well-being and productivity, and express their individuality.

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The Psychology Of Color: Research Findings
  • Up to 90% of snap judgments made about products can be based on color alone (depending on the product).
  • Colors influence how consumers view the "personality" of the brand in question.
  • Our brains prefer recognizable brands, which makes color incredibly important when creating a brand identity.
  • Predicting consumer reaction to color appropriateness in relation to the product is far more important than the individual color itself.
  • The context a color is used is fundamental for its perception. 
  • It’s the feeling, mood, and image that your brand create that play a role in persuasion. 
  • The majority of consumers prefer color patterns with similar hues, but favor palettes with a highly contrasting accent color.

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