Get Ready for Prime Time - Deepstash

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Tough Love: How Not to Bore an Audience

Get Ready for Prime Time

Rehearse. An audience doesn't want to see you struggling to say what's on your mind. 

They've come for a show, an organized presentation of thought. Know your lines: your opening line, headlines, bottom line, and story lines. Being prepared will help you come across in a conversational manner, too.

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Engage your Audience
Engage your Audience
  • Ask questions.
  • Ask to introduce themselves.
  • Do a paper or online survey.
  • Ask them during the presentation.
  • Create a "Round ...
Improve your Presentation
  • Welcome humor that happens.
  • Enliven your slides with pictures you have taken of people, product, or locations.
  • Insert short video clips to hear from significant people.
  • Tell a story to illustrate your points.
  • Format your presentation like a story with a problem and solution.
  • Use slides only as a backup; the audience and you come before the slides.
Keep only the essential
Speaking to an audience is like feeding apple sauce to a two-year old. The more you spoon out, the more ends up on the floor. Include on the slides and in your spoken text only the informa...
Don't try to impress

The less you try to impress your listeners with your knowledge, the more they'll respect you.

Cut out specialized vocabulary and speak to your audience in their language.

Work from the outside in

Your posture, gestures, and facial expressions influence how you feel.

So stand up straight, weight on both feet. Keep your chin up. Chest out, Open up and smile. Those actions make you look and feel good.

A TED Talk is 18 minutes long
A TED Talk is 18 minutes long

TED curator Chris Anderson explains:
The 18-minute length works much like the way Twitter forces people to be disciplined in what they write. By forcing speakers who are u...

Give a TED-style talk that gets a lot of views
  • Arrange your message onto the 9-up format: same size as sticky notes, until you are happy with the flow.
  • Solicit feedback from effective presenters that you trust to give honest, unfiltered feedback on your narrative and slides.
  • Rehearse with a great (honest) communicator that is not afraid to speak up.
  • Articulate each point clearly.
  • Practice with a clock counting up the minutes, to know how much you're over. Then trim it down.
  • Once you're within the timeframe, practice with a clock counting down. Know where you should be at 6, 12 and 18 minutes.
  • Let your coach jot down what you say well and what you don’t.
  • Don’t be camera shy. Practice by videotaping yourself.
  • Do one more full timed rehearsal right before you walk on stage.
  • Pick two natural places you could stop in your talk, then demarcate those as possible endings.