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6 Exercises To Reverse Bad Posture

Back Pain And Posture

Maintaining the natural lumbar curve in your low back is essential to preventing posture-related back pain. This natural curve works as a shock absorber, helping to distribute weight along the length of your spine.

When you neglect your posture, you invite chronic back pain. Standing up and exercising helps with adjusting postural distortions and can help stop back pain.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

6 Exercises To Reverse Bad Posture

6 Exercises To Reverse Bad Posture

https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-15552/6-exercises-to-reverse-bad-posture.html

mindbodygreen.com

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Key Ideas

Back Pain And Posture

Maintaining the natural lumbar curve in your low back is essential to preventing posture-related back pain. This natural curve works as a shock absorber, helping to distribute weight along the length of your spine.

When you neglect your posture, you invite chronic back pain. Standing up and exercising helps with adjusting postural distortions and can help stop back pain.

The Chin Tuck Stretch

  • Sitting or standing, roll your shoulders back and down.
  • While looking straight ahead, place two fingers on your chin, slightly tuck your chin and move your head back .
  • Hold for 3-5 seconds and then release.
  • Repeat 10 times.
  • Tip: The more of a double chin you create, the better the results. 

The Wall Angel Stretch

  • Stand with your back against a flat wall with your feet about four inches from the base. Maintain a slight bend in your knees. 
  • Bring your arms up with elbows bent so your upper arms are parallel to the floor and squeeze your shoulder blades together, forming a letter "W". Hold for 3 seconds.
  • Straighten your elbows to raise your arms up to form the letter “Y.” Repeat this 10 times, starting at “W,” holding for 3 seconds and then raising your arms into a “Y.” Do 2-3 sets.

Doorway Stretch

  • Standing in a doorway, lift your arm so it's parallel to the floor.
  • Bend at the elbow so your fingers point toward the ceiling.
  • Place your hand on the doorjamb.
  • Slowly lean into your raised arm and push against the doorjamb for 7-10 seconds.
  • Relax the pressure and then press your arm against the doorjamb again, this time coming into a slight lunge with your legs so your chest moves forward past the doorjamb for 7-10 seconds.
  • Repeat this stretch two to three times on each side.

Hip Flexor Stretch

  • Kneel onto your right knee with toes down.
  • Place your left foot flat on the floor in front of you.
  • Place both hands on your left thigh.
  • Press your hips forward until you feel a good stretch in the hip flexors.
  • Contract your abdominals and slightly tilt your pelvis back while keeping your chin parallel to the floor.
  • Hold this pose for 20-30 seconds, and then switch sides.

The X-Move

You need the resistance band to do the following:
  • Sit on the floor with your legs extended forward.
  • Place the middle of the resistance band around the bottom of your feet and cross one side over the other to form an "X".
  • Grasp the ends of the band with your arms extended in front of you.
  • Pull the ends of the band toward your hips, bending your elbows so they point backward.
  • Hold and slowly return. Do 8-12 repetitions for three sets.

The V-Move

You need the resistance band to do the following:
  • While standing, stagger your feet so one is slightly behind the other.
  • Grasp the handles, or the ends, of the resistance band and lift your arms upward and slightly outward away from your body about 30 degrees.
  • Keep a slight bend in your elbows. Stop at shoulder level; hold and return.
  • Make sure to keep your shoulder blades down and back straight.
  • Repeat this exercise for 2 minutes each day, five days a week.

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Your computer screen

View your computer screen with a straight neck. Put your screen in front of you at a comfortable viewing height. Don't look down at your screen or angle your screen, so you must twist your neck.

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Test Your Posture

Test your back and neck posture against a wall or check proper posture illustrations to find any areas you need to work on when standing. 

Be more aware of your feet when you’re standing and adjust your weight so it’s distributed evenly across both feet.

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Do pilates and other core strengthening exercises to help you stand taller and maintain a proper posture. 

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Consequences Of Bad Posture
  • Slouching promotes low mood, decreased energy levels and can even impair student performance on a math test.
  • Upright posture is linked with improved mood and energy levels among people with symptoms of depression.
  • The bent-over posture associated with smartphone use could hamper breathing and impair respiratory function.
Combating Bad Posture
  • Switch up your desk setup in ways that promote proper posture.
  • Pulling exercises will strengthen them your back muscles, but upright or bent-over rows are ideal.
  • Planks, push-ups, dead lifts and other exercises that make you hold your body in a rigid position help develop posture as they activate your core and stabilizer muscles.
  • Glute bridges help to increase strength and flexibility of hips and that promotes stable movement and posture.
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  • If you spend the bulk of your week sitting with poor posture a few hours of exercise won’t fix it. 
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Plants
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  • A peace lily plant requires little sunlight to survive and you only have to water it when the soil is dried out and is also great for cleaning the air.
  • Cacti and aloe plants are other low-maintenance plants to consider.

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Aspects we get wrong about walking
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How we're sitting
How we're sitting

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The tendency to slump

If you tend to slump, you need to learn to lengthen your back. Use the time that you're sitting to stretch yourself against the backrest.

  • Sit with your bottom well back in your chair while moving your upper body away from the backrest.
  • Place your fists on the front lower border of your rib cage, then gently push back on your rib cage so as to elongate your lower back.
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The P.A.U.L. method (10 minutes)
The P.A.U.L. method (10 minutes)

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Complete this circuit three times with a 30-second rest between each round.

The 3-HIIT wonder (10 minutes)
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What Self-Care Means

Self-care essentially means tuning in to our true needs, and making them a priority, rather than neglecting them in favor of obligations or urgent (but not important) tasks.

The&nbs...

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How we start our day is key to our daily lives.

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It's The Little Things

Little things like focusing on your breath, some moderate exercise, taking care of your posture, relaxing with your favorite TV show

are great ways to do some self-care that they don't require any extra time, like a spa therapy or a vacation.

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Schedule “movement breaks” 

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The movement needs to be reasonably active and needs to get you out of breath. Afterward, you will feel more productive.

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