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9 Mantras For Anxiety That Experts Use Themselves

Mantras Against Anxiety

Mantras Against Anxiety
  1. Try starting a phrase with “I am” followed by an adjective and repeat slowly, as a set of three. Ex: “I am at peace”.
  2. Remind yourself that nothing lasts forever by repeating "this too will pass" in rhythm with your breath.
  3. Fit the following affirmation to what you need in the moment: “I am _____, and I deserve every _____ thing.” Ex: “I am beautiful and I deserve every beauty-filled thing.”
  4. “It’s not about you.” is a mantra that helps with concerns about the opinions of others.
  5. “All is well.” If repeated several times reminds you hat things are going to be OK.
  6. Acknowledge the good things in your life during a moment of anxiety by repeating “thank you.” 
  7. Repeating “Calm down” to yourself with deep breathing exercises may be useful.
  8. You are lovable.” Is useful if you are feeling stressed or panicked over a loved one.
  9. “What can I see and experience today that will thrill and amaze me?” will refocus your mind on something positive rather than negative.

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9 Mantras For Anxiety That Experts Use Themselves

9 Mantras For Anxiety That Experts Use Themselves

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/mantras-for-anxiety_n_5b8570c0e4b0162f471cdfda

huffpost.com

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Key Ideas

“Mantras can be helpful for folks with anxiety in two ways: They can focus the mind, and they can provide counter-narratives to anxiety-provoking automatic thoughts.”

Chantelle Doswell...

“Mantras can be helpful for folks with anxiety in two ways: They can focus the mind, and they can provide counter-narratives to anxiety-provoking automatic thoughts.”

Chantelle Doswell, lecturer at Columbia University’s School of Social Work.

Mantras Against Anxiety

  1. Try starting a phrase with “I am” followed by an adjective and repeat slowly, as a set of three. Ex: “I am at peace”.
  2. Remind yourself that nothing lasts forever by repeating "this too will pass" in rhythm with your breath.
  3. Fit the following affirmation to what you need in the moment: “I am _____, and I deserve every _____ thing.” Ex: “I am beautiful and I deserve every beauty-filled thing.”
  4. “It’s not about you.” is a mantra that helps with concerns about the opinions of others.
  5. “All is well.” If repeated several times reminds you hat things are going to be OK.
  6. Acknowledge the good things in your life during a moment of anxiety by repeating “thank you.” 
  7. Repeating “Calm down” to yourself with deep breathing exercises may be useful.
  8. You are lovable.” Is useful if you are feeling stressed or panicked over a loved one.
  9. “What can I see and experience today that will thrill and amaze me?” will refocus your mind on something positive rather than negative.

On Anxiety

Anxiety is a common emotion characterized by feelings of tension, worried thoughts and physical changes like increased blood pressure. If left untreated, anxiety can be crippling. It can lead to lightheadedness, nausea, headaches, stomach pains, panic attacks and more.

Therapy, medication or a combination of the two are vital if anxiety is inhibiting your daily life. And for a quick fix, experts say relaxation techniques like mantras can help.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Stop And Breathe

Anxiety is typically experienced as worrying about a future or past event. But anxiety loses its grip when you clear your mind of worry and bring your awareness back to the present.

When a...

A Simple Breathing Technique
  • Sit in a comfortable position.
  • Close your eyes and inhale slowly through your nose.
  • Exhale deeply.
  • Continue to breathe deeply and fully. Allow your breath to be a guide to the present.
  • With each breath in, think to yourself “be” and with each breath out, focus on the word “present. ”
Figure Out What's Bothering You

The physical symptoms of panic and anxiety, such as trembling, chest pain, and rapid heartbeat, are more obvious than the reason you are anxious. But, to get to the root of your anxiety, you need to stop and think about your thoughts and feelings.

Writing all that bothers you or talking with a friend can help you understand your anxious feelings.

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Use Aromatherapy

Whether they’re in oil form, incense, or a candle, scents like lavender, chamomile, and sandalwood can be very soothing.

Aromatherapy is thought to help activate certain receptors in your ...

Go For a Walk Or Do Yoga

Walking away from an anxiety inducing situation can be very effective. Taking some time to focus on your body and not your mind may help relieve your anxiety.

Write Down Your Thoughts

Writing down what’s making you anxious gets it out of your head and can make it less daunting.

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Decide What You Want Out Of Life

Identify what you want to change about your life. It can help you focus on the promises you're making to yourself. 

Try to focus on one change at a time.

Envision The Life You Want

When you start to visualize your life in the way you want it to be, things can start to move in that direction. 

What do you already have that brings you closer to your vision?

Experiences That Make You Happy

Try to think about the experiences that truly make you happy and engage with them as often as you can until they are wired into your brain.

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Sama Vritti or “Equal Breathing”

How it’s done:  Inhale for a count of 4, then exhale for a count of 4, all through the nose, which adds a natural resistance to the breath. Once you manage it, you can go up to a c...

Abdominal Breathing Technique
How it’s done: With one hand on the chest and the other on the belly, take a deep breath in through the nose, ensuring the diaphragm inflates with enough air to create a stretch in the lungs. The goal: 6 to 10 deep, slow breaths per minute for 10 minutes each day to experience immediate reductions to heart rate and blood pressure.

When it works best: Before an exam, or any stressful event.

Nadi Shodhana or “Alternate Nostril Breathing”

How it’s done: Starting in a comfortable meditative pose, hold the right thumb over the right nostril and inhale deeply through the left nostril. At the peak of inhalation, close off the left nostril with the ring finger, then exhale through the right nostril. Continue the pattern, inhaling through the right nostril, closing it off with the right thumb and exhaling through the left nostril.

When it works best: Crunch time, or whenever it’s time to focus or energize.

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Taking cues from you

When children witness a parent in a state of anxiety, they can become unsettled, because they take information about how to interpret situations from the parent.

If you notice your child sho...

Learn stress management techniques

A big part of treatment for children with anxiety is to teach parents stress tolerance.

A mental health professional can help you work through methods of stress management for your specific needs.

Model stress tolerance

You might learn strategies in therapy that you can impart to your child when she is feeling anxious.

Try to maintain a calm, neutral demeanor in front of your child, even if you are still trying to manage your anxiety. Children are quick to read facial expressions.

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Limit the time spent reading news

“Headline anxiety” is a growing problem. 

One way to reduce the impact of the non-stop news cycle is to use screen-time trackers, available for most smartphones, to limit...

Turn off push notifications

If the urge to scroll is too strong to resist, then at least turning off your push notifications from news apps can stop you from being assailed with breaking events. 

Read the good news

If we focus on the bigger picture, such as the proportion of people living in extreme poverty halving in the past 20 years, it may be easier to remain optimistic. 

Seek another perspective. If you hear about something terrible, ask yourself: "if there had been a positive improvement, would I have heard about that?”

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Loving-kindness meditation

Also known as Metta meditation; the goal is to cultivate an attitude of love and kindness toward everything.
During meditation, practitioners send and repeat messages of loving-kind...

Body scan or progressive relaxation

The goal is to notice tension and to allow it to be released.
Practitioners start at one end of their body, usually their feet, and work through the whole. They might tense and then relax muscles or they might visualize a wave moving over their body to release tension.

Mindfulness meditation

It encourages practitioners to notice their surroundings without judgement, instead of dwelling on the past or future.

Mindfulness can be done almost anywhere, even in a grocery store, for example.

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Peace, despite the noise in your mind
  • Understand it is impossible to silence your mind: It’s human to have thoughts. 
  • The more you fight your thoughts, the more you amplify them. Being non-judgmental is the key to sti...
Increase focus and stay present:
  • Mentally remind yourself of your present action: Use self-talk to direct your focus back to the present moment.
  • Focus on your senses: Direct your attention back into your body and out of your head.
  • Do things differently: Make things more challenging. As a result, you are forced to act consciously instead of acting on autopilot.
What It Means to Be Tough

Toughness is experiencing something that is subjectively distressing, and then leaning in, paying attention, and creating space to take a thoughtful action that aligns with your core values....

Know Your Core Values

Think of 3-5 things that matter most to you. They may be guiding principles of your life or aspects of the person you want to become.

Then write a sentence or two on each, describing what they mean to you. These are the values you’ll want to act in service of when the going gets tough.

Embrace Pain, but Don’t React to It

When you react to it, that's when it transforms into suffering.

You can learn to experience pain neutrally is through meditation: it teaches you to accept pain, sit with it and then move on, instead of reacting to it with stress.

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Emotions During a Difficult Conversation

It’s hard not to get worked up emotionally when you’re in a tense conversation: a disagreement can feel like a threat.

But if your body goes into “fight or flight” mode,  ...

Breathe

When you start noticing yourself getting tense, try to focus on breathing (on feeling the air coming in and out of your lungs).

This will take your attention off the physical signs of panic and keep you centered.

Focus on your body

Sitting still when you’re having a difficult conversation can make the emotions build up rather than dissipate. 

Standing up and walking around helps to activate the thinking part of your brain.

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