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11 Habits Of People Who Never Worry

Know How To Perceive Negative Emotions

Know How To Perceive Negative Emotions

Severe chronic worriers are less accepting of their emotions, meaning they're intolerant of uncertainty and negative emotions.

Meanwhile, non-worriers tend to look at negative emotions as a sign that whatever is causing those emotions needs attention. They use emotions to make informed decisions.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

11 Habits Of People Who Never Worry

11 Habits Of People Who Never Worry

https://www.huffpostbrasil.com/2015/08/11/dont-worry-strategies-tips-habits_n_5092683.html

huffpostbrasil.com

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Key Ideas

Know How To Perceive Negative Emotions

Severe chronic worriers are less accepting of their emotions, meaning they're intolerant of uncertainty and negative emotions.

Meanwhile, non-worriers tend to look at negative emotions as a sign that whatever is causing those emotions needs attention. They use emotions to make informed decisions.

Ask The Right Questions.

Worriers can decrease anxiety by asking themselves the following:
  • Is it my problem?
  • Do I have any control over it?
  • Have I already done everything about it that I can? And is it imminent?

See Positive Outcomes

A worrier would likely only think of the worst-case scenario, while a non-worrier would have the capacity to think that there could be a positive outcome to a negative event.

Confidence To Handle Whatever Comes

Worriers extensively consider what could go wrong but lack confidence in their ability to cope with those crisis despite them often performing well in a crisis.

Non-worriers on the other hand just trust they will be able to handle whatever happens.

Designate Time For Worry

One reason why people engage their worry is they tried to solve problem immediately and start anticipating and planning against possible outcomes. It grabs attention off of other more pressing matters.

Reserve 15 minutes of your day where you can just think and ponder over your worries on your own, keep your worrying to this time only and preferably to the same place too.

Get To The Root Of Worry

Worrying can spin out of control until the thing you're worried about is 10 steps removed from your immediate issue. But it is important to figure out what the real problem is in order to stop the worry cycle.

It's important to move from problem-generation, which is what worriers are prone to do, to problem-solving. 

A Sense Of Perspective

Non-worriers are able to distance themselves from a situation in order to gain perspective. Worriers can do that too by thinking of all the worst possible scenarios, and evaluating their likelihood of happening.

Another strategy is to talk about yourself in the third person so you can distance yourself from the problem a little.

Willing To Take Chances

Non-worriers are more likely to test out solutions despite the risk of bad outcomes and are more flexible in the way they think about things, so they don't get stuck in a negative thinking rut.

Positive Thinkers

Research indicates that the brains of positive thinkers are less active than those of the negative thinkers/worriers when looking at anxiety inducing images. It was also found that trying to think positively further activated the brain of worriers.

Practice Mindfulness

This helps to keep them in the present by steering their focus away from a hypothetical issue that could develop down the road.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and acceptance and commitment therapy, can also help worriers stop the negative cycle, since they focus on not wrestling and disconfirming the worries, but getting people to focus on their life and values and focus on the present moment so they can make decisions.

Focus On The Present

Non-worriers are able to look at a problem and recognize what solution needs to be implemented, but a worrier isn't able to get that kind of distance and imagine the individual occurrence becoming a pattern.

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We all worry

All people experience negative or troubling thoughts from time to time. Worry helps us to anticipate and prepare for the challenges in life.

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Most worries never happen
Many of the worries that occupy an anxious mind never come to pass.

People with anxiety disorders focus on the fact that bad things can happen. They also tend to face the same worries repeatedly.

Anxiety-reducing techniques
  • Write down your negative predictions and test them out. See how often they come to pass.
  • Allocate a specific time and place to think about your fears. Many find that it helps them escape from constant anxiety. They also find that when the scheduled time arrives, the problem no longer concerns them.
Take Up Knitting

Keeping your hands busy has been found by research to help keep the mind off of worries. Verbal distractions, such as counting out loud, had no benefit.

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Write Down Your Worries

Getting your emotions down on paper can decrease anxieties, as you reassess them while writing. 

Engage In Forest Therapy

Spending time within a forest setting can reduce psychological stress, depressive symptoms, and hostility, while at the same time improving sleep, and increasing both vigor and a feeling of liveliness

20 minutes of walking in the woods and listening to the sounds of nature alter cerebral blood flow in a manner that indicated a state of relaxation and reduced stress hormone levels.

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Inversion

Is the way of thinking in which you consider the opposite of what you want.

Inversion puts a spotlight on errors and roadblocks that are not obvious at first glance. What if the opposi...

The "kill the company" strategy

The idea is to identify challenges and points of failure so you can develop a plan to prevent them ahead of time.

Imagine the most important goal or project you are working on right now. Then fast forward 6 months and assume the project or goal has failed. Tell the story of how it happened and ask yourself, “What could cause this to go horribly wrong?”

Inversion and productivity

Applying inversion to productivity you could ask, “What if I wanted to decrease my focus? How do I end up distracted?” 

The answer to these question may help you discover interruptions you can eliminate to free up more time and energy each day.

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Learn To Relax

You cannot possibly feel anxious when you are in a state of relaxation. Try: 

  • Progressive muscle relaxation
  • Meditation
  • Yoga
  • Visualiza...
Turn Your Thoughts Around

Worry is often a learned negative thinking pattern that can be contributing to your panic disorder symptoms. Since negative thinking typically develops over time, it can be unlearned and replaced with more positive views.

To do that, recognize and record your worries throughout the day, think it they are realistic and replace these negative thoughts with more realistic statements.

Journal Through It

By writing in a journal, you can work through your difficult emotions, uncover solutions to your issues, and change your perceptions and worries.

Getting started in journal writing can be a simple as a dedicated time each day to write down your inner thoughts. 

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Inversion

It is a mental model, a way of thinking backward about what you don’t want to happen. It is about taking an idea upside down and thinking about what could go wrong.

Avoiding failure

Avoiding mistakes is an under-appreciated way to improve.

In most jobs, you can enjoy some degree of success simply by being proactive and reliable—even if you are not particularly smart, fast, or talented in a given area. Sometimes it is more important to consider why people fail in life than why they succeed.

Project Management

Failure Premortem/ Kill the company: one of the applications of inversion, in which you imagine the most important goal or project you are working on right now, then fast forward six months and assume the project or goal has failed.

Tell the story of how it happened. What went wrong? What mistakes did you make? How did it fail? 

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Anxiety is rewarding

Each time we worry and nothing bad happens, our mind connects worry with preventing harm:

Worry → nothing bad happens.

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Beliefs about worry
  • If I worry, I'll never have a bad surprise.
  • It's safer if I worry. We believe that the act of worrying itself somehow lowers the likelihood of a dreaded outcome. 
  • I show I care by worrying. We need to distinguish between caring about a situation and worrying needlessly and fruitlessly about it. 
  • Worrying motivates me. We need to differentiate between unproductive worry and productive concern and problem solving.
  • Worrying helps me solve problems. Extreme worry is more likely to interfere with problem-solving. 
Tools to assist us with worry
  • Calm the nervous system with guided muscle relaxation, meditation, and exercise. 
  • Notice when you're worrying and any beliefs that reinforce worry.  Awareness of the process gives us more choice in how we respond.
  • Embrace uncertainty. Most of the things we care about in life involve uncertainty. It takes considerable practice to begin to embrace it.
  • Live in the present. Practice focusing your attention on the present in everyday activities like taking a shower, walking, or talking with a friend, as well as in more formal practices like meditation or yoga.
  • When we face our fears head-on, they tend to diminish. Deliberately accept what you're afraid of: "It's possible I'll miss my flight." 
Why We Worry

The motivation for your worry often comes from past events.

Alain De Botton explains that this is due to traumatic events from our childhood that were never properly processed.

How to move on from worry
Once you recognize the source of your anxieties, you can replace worry with reflection.

“Appreciating the childhood legacy of worries, we also stand to realize that we can adapt and improve on how we respond to what alarms us.”  -- Philosopher Alain de Botton.

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Mindfulness = anxiety antidote

Trying to push the worries out of your head is inherently problematic because to be vigilant about not thinking about something, your brain needs to keep it in mind. 

Mindfulness does the opposite by making you aware of your state of anxiousness.

Build the Mindfulness muscles
  • Acceptance: accept that the worries are here and stop trying to make them go away.
  • Attention: get out of your thoughts and focus on the world around you.
  • Labeling: When a worry pops up, label it as “a worrying thought.” It’s not you. Do not identify with it and don't let it overtake you.

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Establish what you can control

Recognize that in most situations, all you can control is your effort and your attitude. 

When you put your energy into the things you can control, you'll be much more effective.

Your influence

You can influence people and circumstances, but you can't force things to go your way:

  • To have the most influence, focus on changing your behavior. Be a good role model and set healthy boundaries for yourself.
  • When you have concerns about someone else's choices, share your opinion, but only share it once. Don't try to fix people who don't want to be fixed.
Identify your fears

Think about what you could do when failure happens.

Usually, the worst-case scenario isn't as tragic as you might envision. Acknowledging that you can handle the worst-case scenario can help you put your energy into more productive exercises.

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Simulating a crisis
Simulating a crisis

Modeling systems are used to provide a better understanding of a bad situation and how to possibly prevent it.

Groups of researchers, teams of engineers and companies are d...

Why we use models
  • A model is just a series of calculations that abstractly represent some systems in the real world. We use models all the time.
  • We may work out the routes we could take to get to work at a specific time of the day. We use past data to make predictions about what we can expect in the future in a given set of circumstances.
  • As the volume of data and the number of variables increase, the computational task would increase.
  • Powerful models aim to forecast inherently unpredictable events and make use of machine learning to look for patterns in the data that would otherwise be missed.
The accuracy of a model

You can never accurately predict what's going to happen. Some efforts come close.

For example, models looking at the weather can achieve more than 90% accuracy. But crises are about change, and a model working from historical data may miss a dramatic and new change.

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