Tooth enamel - Deepstash
Tooth enamel

Tooth enamel

It is produced by a type of cell called an ameloblast. These secrete the proteins that form enamel while the tooth is still in the gum. Unfortunately, once the process of forming tooth enamel is complete and the tooth has emerged, our ameloblasts die off. But we continue to lose enamel throughout our lifetime.

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MORE IDEAS FROM This New Treatment Could Heal Tooth Cavities Without Any Fillings

New dental treatment may heal tooth cavities without any filling

Scientists have invented a new product that can encourage tooth enamel to grow back, which means we could finally have a game-changing way to treat dental cavities. It is based on peptides - short chains of amino acids, linked by peptide bonds, that aren't long enough to be considered full proteins.

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Our teeth can be remineralised?

To a small extent, our teeth can bed with the help remineralise of saliva, fluoride toothpaste and drinking water additives. But once there's a visible cavity on the tooth, it needs to be treated by a dentist - which usually means drilling, and packing the hole with a dental filling. To develop their new treatment, the team turned to one of the proteins produced by ameloblasts.Β 

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πŸ“ŒProcedure

They applied it to dental lesions in a laboratory setting and found that it helped form a new mineralised layer to the demineralised areas, integrating it with the enamel underneath. They also treated similar lesions with fluoride, but only the peptide treatment resulted in the remineralisation of a relatively thick layer - resembling the structure of healthy enamel.

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RELATED IDEA

Myth 1: Sugar Causes Cavities

While sugar does contribute to the formation of cavities, it’s not the sugar itself that causes the problem. Rather, it’s the bacteria that eats the sugar. Sticky food, like starches, attracts bacteria to thrive on and around teeth. These bacteria produce an acid compound that promotes tooth decay. Rinse and brush after meals to reduce acid and plaque buildup.

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FAQs On Teeth Staining
  1. What causes teeth staining? food, drinks, smoking, and even simply aging.
  2. How can I prevent teeth staining? AvoidΒ certain foods and beverages that stain your teeth, quit smoking , and keep up with good oral care routines (brushing twice daily, rinsing with mouthwash and flossing daily, chewing sugar-free gum between meals, and seeing your dentist at least twice a year)
  3. What foods stain your teeth?Β Foods that are bright or bold in color are the most likely to stain your teeth. Red pasta sauces, berries such as blueberries and raspberries, and bright curries all can contribute to teeth staining.

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170 million gallons

...is the amount of sparkling water Americans drink each year.

Sparkling waters are the latest in health chic, providing all the fizzy refreshment of a soft drink with none of those wicked calories. As with any health food trend, questions of its validly abound.

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