Internal and external frames of reference - Deepstash

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Communication Styles, How to Become an Effective Communicator

Internal and external frames of reference

Internal and external frames of reference
  • When trying to communicate effectively with someone who has an internal frame of reference, appeal to the things they know about themselves. Tie your communication to a personal fact you already know about that person.
  • Those with an external frame of reference want to hear more about what their peers thought about a given program or decision.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

69% of managers

...say they’re uncomfortable communicating with employees. 

And that number is significantly higher when the roles are reversed.

Analytical communication style

An analytical communicator loves hard data, numbers, and specific language. 

They're usually wary of people who deal in vague language and strictly blue-sky ideas and get drained quickly when conversations move from logical to emotional.

Working with an analytical communication style

Dos:

  • Provide as much detail upfront as possible
  • Set clear expectations
  • Give them space to work independently

Don'ts:

  • Turning the conversation emotional;
  • Framing feedback on their work as criticism.
Communication during stressful times
Communication during stressful times

Uncertainty has a way to reveal everyone's strengths and weaknesses. During drastic uncertainty, employees will seek more information in order to achieve a sense of certainty. During this unstable time, you'll discover the true quality of your team's communication skills. If you team is arguing, productivity is lagging.

Discovering each member's communication preferences will enable you to determine the best way forward.

Managing the passive communicators
  • Talk to them one-on-one. They will feel more comfortable opening up.
  • Offer multiple modes of communication. Instead of calling on them during a meeting, send them an email afterward.
  • Help them feel psychologically safe at work. Let your team know they won't face negative consequences for voicing their opinion respectfully.

Passive communicators battle to express their needs and stand by their convictions. This is because they want to avoid conflict. They may be silent during crucial meetings. If they do make a suggestion and it is challenged, they may say, "never mind then."

Managing the aggressive communicators
  • Outline and enforce boundaries. If they interrupt someone, step in and say, "Please let [Name} finish, and afterward, we'll give you time to speak too."
  • Give them a safe and healthy way to vent their anger. People under pressure are more likely to act out. Pull them aside for a one-on-one time to address their concerns.

Aggressive Communicators voice their opinions in a straightforward, often blunt way. They often interrupt others, take up significantly more time than others during meetings and don't take into account others' feelings or opinions.

Heidi Grant Halvorson

"In a fast-moving, competitive world, being able to learn new skills is one of the keys to success. It’s not..."

Heidi Grant Halvorson
Check your readiness

Learning a new skill takes commitment. And there are certain limits to what you can learn. So, before starting working on a new skill, ask yourself:

  • If your goal really is attainable
  • How much time and energy you can give to this process.
Make sure it’s needed

Make sure the skills you've chosen are relevant to your career, your organization, or both. 

Gaining a new skill is an investment and you need to know upfront what the return will be.