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Communication Styles, How to Become an Effective Communicator

Convincing people

Part of establishing trust, or being able to convince someone, is sensing the different needs of different people. 

  • If you’re trying to sell someone a product, and they trust you immediately, you know you’re going to be able to do your job. 
  • If you sense you’re with someone who needs more convincing, see if there’s a tool you can use to help develop a bond with your potential customer.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Communication Styles, How to Become an Effective Communicator

Communication Styles, How to Become an Effective Communicator

https://www.tonyrobbins.com/personal-growth/communication-styles/

tonyrobbins.com

7

Key Ideas

Being a powerful communicator

It doesn’t mean you speak the loudest or most often, but rather that  you are getting your message across clearly and also taking in the messages you’re receiving from the people around you.

Moving toward or away

Observe if those you’re speaking to are moving toward or away, by asking what that person wants.

If they start listing things they don’t want (they don’t want to fail, they don’t want to be stuck in the same dead-end job) or talking about what they do want  (a family, to succeed at their job) then you’ll know how to direct the conversation.

Internal and external frames of reference

  • When trying to communicate effectively with someone who has an internal frame of reference, appeal to the things they know about themselves. Tie your communication to a personal fact you already know about that person.
  • Those with an external frame of reference want to hear more about what their peers thought about a given program or decision.

How people sort themselves

We all sort ourselves in two distinct ways: We either self-sort or sort by thinking about others.
  • Self-sorters look at an interaction or decision and think, “What’s in it for me?” 
  • Someone who sorts by thinking of others responds to questions by wondering how it will affect those around them.

Matching or mismatching

If you’re looking to be persuasive with someone, you want to see things through their eyes and communicate in a way they can relate to.

  • Matchers look for sameness in the world, trying to understand how things relate to each other. 
  • Mismatchers see how things are different

Convincing people

Part of establishing trust, or being able to convince someone, is sensing the different needs of different people. 

  • If you’re trying to sell someone a product, and they trust you immediately, you know you’re going to be able to do your job. 
  • If you sense you’re with someone who needs more convincing, see if there’s a tool you can use to help develop a bond with your potential customer.

Possibility vs. necessity

  • People motivated by possibility make choices based on what they want to do and are hopeful about pursuing the unknown. 
  • Those who make decisions based on necessity do things because they feel they have to. People who are driven by acts out of a feeling of necessity are trustworthy and can be predictable. 
Both types of people have their virtues, but in order to get your message across to either one, it helps to identify who is who.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

69% of managers

...say they’re uncomfortable communicating with employees. 

And that number is significantly higher when the roles are reversed.

Analytical communication style

An analytical communicator loves hard data, numbers, and specific language. 

They're usually wary of people who deal in vague language and strictly blue-sky ideas and get drained quickly when conversations move from logical to emotional.

Working with an analytical communication style

Dos:

  • Provide as much detail upfront as possible
  • Set clear expectations
  • Give them space to work independently

Don'ts:

  • Turning the conversation emotional;
  • Framing feedback on their work as criticism.

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Cut all the contact

Keep your distance and don’t text, email, meet in person or call.

Cutting the ties for good when it’s over puts you on a faster path to healing.

  • Set up an “Emergency ...

Let Your Emotions Out

Cry, sob your eyes out, scream and yell. As long as it doesn’t hurt yourself or anybody else, find ways to release and let go of the pain you may be feeling. 

Listen to sad songs. Listening to sad songs can regulate negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. 

Accept the fact that it’s over

Coping with the end of a relationship is a little bit like a 12 step program. You will reach acceptance far sooner by staying away from that person.

Don’t over-analyze what could have been different. Your mission now is to get to the place where you aren’t battling with yourself about the way things are. Do this with compassion and don’t beat yourself up.

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74 % of employees...

...feel that they’re missing out on company information and news.

Moreover, just 4 in 10 employees can confidently describe to others what their employer does.

Improve employee communication

Employee communication must:

  • Be clear: communicate in plain language, lose the buzzwords, be straightforward, and write with clarity.
  • Be inclusive and adaptive: see which channels and technologies they prefer, and adapt accordingly.
  • Be varied: send employees different kinds of messages via different mediums.
  • Empower your employees: communicators should educate and motivate, but they should also uplift and empower.