The groundwork for a search engine - Deepstash
The groundwork for a search engine

The groundwork for a search engine

In 1963, before Arpanet, the proto-internet, and way before the launch of Google, two men sent the first known long-distance computer query.

Research engineer Charles Bourne and computer programmer Leonard Chaitin forgot about their experiment for about three decades, not knowing what it would become.

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MORE IDEAS FROM When Was the Earliest Internet Search?

At the time of Bourne and Chaitin's breakthrough, most approaches for retrieving information were physical, for example, data stored on punch cards and sorted by machine.

The program they designed work the way Google does. A user could search for any word in the files. The data was sent over telephone lines, and after a long moment, the right answer was retrieved. Despite the success, the project was shut down. The world at that time had no use for the innovation.

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